National Geographic

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  • Meet 5 "Zombie" Parasites That Mind-Control Their Hosts

    National Geographic News: Animals
    Mary Bates
    31 Oct 2014 | 3:07 pm
    It's no Halloween movie—some parasites hijack their hosts' brains to make them act in horrific ways.
  • Amazon Warriors Did Indeed Fight and Die Like Men

    National Geographic News: Ancient World
    Simon Worrall
    29 Oct 2014 | 5:01 am
    Archaeology shows that these fierce women also smoked pot, got tattoos, killed—and loved—men.
  • Will Virgin Galactic's Crash End Space Tourism?

    National Geographic News: Space and Tech
    Dan Vergano
    31 Oct 2014 | 2:58 pm
    The fatal explosion of SpaceShipTwo in the Mojave Desert may lead to more scrutiny of the fledgling space passenger industry.
  • Guaranteed to Raise a Smile

    National Geographic Photo of the Day
    31 Oct 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Musicians relax after a daylong photo shoot near the town of Renazzo in Emilia-Romagna, Italy. “My intention was to capture the joy that these guys have making music together,” writes Mirco Balboni, a member of our Your Shot community. “The members of the band kept playing and joking as they entered the field. At that point, I saw that the situation was perfect—the evening light was great and they were carefree in the field, as if they were still children. I saw the happiness in their faces and the joy of playing together.” Balboni’s picture recently appeared in Your Shot’s…
  • The Darker Side of Black Licorice

    Voices
    Youth Radio Investigates
    31 Oct 2014 | 4:18 pm
    Want to test your own knowledge of which candies have tested positive for lead? Check out the “Trick or Treat” app from the team at Youth Radio Interactive.  This Halloween, kids everywhere will be out trick or treating for candy. And while some might worry about the loot rotting our teeth, there’s another more potent risk. Traces of the powerful neurotoxin, lead, can be found in some candy. This isn’t a new concern. For more than a decade, we’ve known about harmful amounts of the metal showing up in chili-flavored sweets imported from Mexico. That problem was…
 
 
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    National Geographic Photo of the Day

  • Guaranteed to Raise a Smile

    31 Oct 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Musicians relax after a daylong photo shoot near the town of Renazzo in Emilia-Romagna, Italy. “My intention was to capture the joy that these guys have making music together,” writes Mirco Balboni, a member of our Your Shot community. “The members of the band kept playing and joking as they entered the field. At that point, I saw that the situation was perfect—the evening light was great and they were carefree in the field, as if they were still children. I saw the happiness in their faces and the joy of playing together.” Balboni’s picture recently appeared in Your Shot’s…
  • Turtle Power

    USER ID: 2795811
    30 Oct 2014 | 9:00 pm
    “On the coast of Tenerife in the Canary Islands, we have quite the selection of affectionate green turtles,” writes photographer Montse Grillo. “This turtle was coming [down] from the surface. The sun behind it and the sun rays surrounding it gave it a special majesty.” This photo was submitted to the 2014 National Geographic Photo Contest. Enter your best shot by October 31 for a chance to win. Download wallpaper » See all contest entries » Browse galleries of our editors' favorites »
  • Valley Flames

    USER ID: 2834117
    29 Oct 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Wildfires rage in a valley behind iconic Half Dome in California’s Yosemite National Park. Judge Helbig captured the photo at 3 a.m. using a one-minute exposure. This photo was submitted to the 2014 National Geographic Photo Contest. Enter your best shot by October 31 for a chance to win. Download wallpaper » See all contest entries » Browse galleries of our editors' favorites »
  • Leap of Faith

    USER ID: 2336302
    28 Oct 2014 | 9:00 pm
    A migrating wildebeest leaps into the low waters of the Mara River in Tanzania. Wildebeests begin their annual migration at the edge of the Serengeti Plains. On their enormous loop following seasonal rains, the more than 1.5 million animals encounter deadly crossings like this one at the Mara, infamous home of the giant Nile crocodile. This photo was submitted to the 2014 National Geographic Photo Contest. Enter your best shot by October 31 for a chance to win. Download wallpaper » See all contest entries » Browse galleries of our editors' favorites »
  • Through the Woods

    27 Oct 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Rain dampens the forest floor along a trail in Montana’s Glacier National Park. Located in the Northern Rocky Mountains, the “crown of the continent” spans more than a million acres of rugged natural terrain. Among the features preserved within its borders are lakes and forests, alpine meadows, and valleys carved from the glaciers that give the park its name. This photo was submitted to the 2014 National Geographic Photo Contest. Enter your best shot by October 31 for a chance to win. See all contest entries » Browse galleries of our editors' favorites »
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    Voices

  • The Darker Side of Black Licorice

    Youth Radio Investigates
    31 Oct 2014 | 4:18 pm
    Want to test your own knowledge of which candies have tested positive for lead? Check out the “Trick or Treat” app from the team at Youth Radio Interactive.  This Halloween, kids everywhere will be out trick or treating for candy. And while some might worry about the loot rotting our teeth, there’s another more potent risk. Traces of the powerful neurotoxin, lead, can be found in some candy. This isn’t a new concern. For more than a decade, we’ve known about harmful amounts of the metal showing up in chili-flavored sweets imported from Mexico. That problem was…
  • Rapa Expedition: The Difficulties of Leaving Paradise

    Paul Rose
    31 Oct 2014 | 3:06 pm
    After exploring, diving, writing, photographing, and just plain living here in Rapa in far southern French Polynesia for the past few weeks, leaving is difficult. The weather is perfect, our ship is in great order, our equipment is stowed ready for the seven-hundred-mile passage, and yet we feel such a strong connection to this community that we just can’t bring ourselves to depart. In fact we have re-calculated the passage plan a few times just so that we leave the site of the latest Pristine Seas expedition as late as possible. A month ago we’d never been to this island in our…
  • OPINION: Tourism Is Important, But It’s Not the Only Reason to Save Elephants

    Guest Blogger
    31 Oct 2014 | 1:43 pm
    By Tanya Saunders Contemplating a road ahead for elephants where they are valued as more than mere tourist attractions. Photograph by Tanya Saunders Those who believe that ecological and moral grounds aren’t sufficient justification to protect elephants and other wildlife in Africa often tout tourism as the most important reason to do so. Examined rationally, this is a narrow and risky premise, with a poor long-term prognosis for the survival of Africa’s wild animals. While tourism undoubtedly earns significant revenue for host countries and plays a part in funding conservation, it is…
  • Ross Island 2014: Journey’s End

    Kenneth W W Sims
    31 Oct 2014 | 11:44 am
    After many trials and near-misses, Kenneth W W Sims has finally obtained his volcanic samples on Antarctica’s Ross Island. Here, he recounts these challenges and those of past explorers. Our fieldwork season in Antarctica is complete! All told, it has been a very successful trip despite less-than-favorable weather. In fact, it has truly been a weather-challenged season that has required patience and “binge working” when the weather allowed. For example, for my last sampling effort, when the weather finally cleared after five stormy days, Alasdair Turner (a full time McMurdo field…
  • EPA Refines Pollution Rules

    Tim Profeta
    30 Oct 2014 | 12:52 pm
    Last week the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was told by a federal appeals court that it could move forward with implementing a program to curb air pollution that crosses state lines. The Cross State Air Pollution Rule (CASPR) would require 28 states to reduce emissions of nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide by power plants. The rule establishes a two-step process: 1) The EPA determines if a state contributes more than 1 percent of the pollution causing a downwind state to exceed emissions standards to 2) The EPA using modeling analysis to determine state emissions targets…
 
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    Intelligent Travel

  • Reader Recs: World’s Spookiest Places

    Megan Heltzel
    31 Oct 2014 | 2:18 pm
    The occasional brush with the occult or the unexplained isn’t enough to keep intrepid travelers at bay, and our Nat Geo Travel fans on Facebook were eager to share their most memorable paranormal experiences. Here are some of their picks—from the underworld of Paris to a chapel of bones in Portugal—for the world’s spookiest destinations: Andrew W. kicks off our list in La Paz, Bolivia, at the Mercado de las Brujas (Witches Market), where a cobblestone street in the city’s old quarter plays host to folk doctors, fortune tellers, and, as the name suggests, witches.
  • Wednesday: #CityTravel Twitter Chat

    Annie Fitzsimmons
    31 Oct 2014 | 8:36 am
    We have seen the great icons of cities—the Colosseum, the Sydney Opera House—so many times in movies or magazines that we often feel a familiarity before we get there. I love those icons; they make me realize I am here, actually here! I still get butterflies when I see the Empire State Building at home in New York City. But most of all when I travel, I’m on the hunt for the everyday rituals that connect locals to their cities—authentic tapas in Barcelona, a great bike path in Boston, a hidden bar in Siem Reap—because they reveal a city’s soul not found in an airport…
  • World’s Most Haunted Cities

    Intelligent Travel
    30 Oct 2014 | 2:16 pm
    These notoriously frightful cities are beset with ghastly, ghostly close encounters. 1. Madrid, Spain: Ghosts haunt all walks of life in this capital city, appearing in museums, like the Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, whose central building was formerly a hospital, and even the imposing Linares Palace, once wracked by family scandal. Join one of many ghost tours and you’ll discover an urban trove of paranormal haunts. Baguio City’s Diplomat Hotel has become a hot spot for ghost hunters and paranormal experts. (Photograph by jeff A, Flickr) 2. Glasgow, Scotland: Glasgow is home to…
  • Meet the People’s Choice Travelers of the Year

    George W. Stone
    30 Oct 2014 | 11:41 am
    Numbers add up—just ask the “Inion Eleven.” Backed by a bounty of votes, this fearless family of global nomads takes the top spot in our People’s Choice contest. Over weeks of frenzied voting, ballots piled up for each of Traveler magazine’s latest class of Travelers of the Year. In the end, the Inion Family—parents Stacey-Jean and Brent, along with their nine kids, five of whom have special needs—demonstrated that there’s strength in numbers and nobility in humility. “We are grateful for the honor your readers have extended to us. Our children are elated,”…
  • The Best New Travel Reads of Fall

    Don George
    30 Oct 2014 | 8:09 am
    Two of the hottest books this fall are set in two of the planet’s coldest locales: Siberia and the South Pole. In Midnight in Siberia, author and NPR host David Greene meets singing babushkas in Buranovo and teenagers hawking meteor fragments in Chelyabinsk, as he travels 6,000 miles by train through the frigid rural heart of Russia. Felicity Aston ventures into even more extreme climes when she sets out to become the first woman to ski solo across Antarctica. Her memoir, Alone in Antarctica, brings to life the terror, the wonder, and the craziness of her two-month ordeal. In his short…
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    Digital Nomad

  • Biking Portland’s Icons

    Robert Reid
    31 Oct 2014 | 10:20 am
    “The coffee isn’t delicious because of anything I do.” Liam Kenna runs a small tasting station that freckles a stark warehouse space with glazed concrete floors, an artful exhibit of historic coffeemaking tools, and a table of beakers to measure coffee pours with lablike precision. “My job as a barista is just not to mess it up.” Wait, this is a barista in Portland? Where’s the self-importance? Along with bikes, microbreweries, and food carts, Portland is famed for its coffee scene, sometimes taken a tad seriously. But Liam is an easygoing coffee barista/manager of Stumptown’s…
  • Going West

    Robert Reid
    27 Oct 2014 | 2:06 pm
    “People came west to get away from the government. Now they have no place else to go, so they think of new ways of doing things.” That’s Bud Clark, the colorful ex-mayor of Portland, Oregon, talking to me recently over a Reuben sandwich at his tavern, the Goose Hollow Inn. When you go west, in the U.S., you don’t just wake up three hours behind the East Coast. You also play by different rules. After trips by train in the Northeast and taking gravel roads across the mountains and prairies, I’m finishing off this year’s series of American road trips with two of my favorite states:…
  • Pierre Parallel: A Detour into Secret South Dakota

    Robert Reid
    17 Sep 2014 | 10:35 am
    “No problem. I’ll be up there as quick as I can get my pants on.” The morning rain has stopped and I’m standing outside a cute century-old red-plank train depot by a grain elevator in Midland, South Dakota. I’ve called one of the three seven- digit numbers listed on the depot’s handmade sign, and in five minutes I meet Mahlon Alcock, a retired rancher. He’s not wearing pants after all, but a baggy pair of blue-and-white Big Mac overalls and a VIP Club ball cap. He’s 91 and drops a cuss word every other sentence as he walks me around hundreds of…
  • Finding Space in the Black Hills

    Robert Reid
    11 Sep 2014 | 1:06 pm
    I’m in a wide-open field of grass. Hundreds of bugs the size of a pencil lead mark scramble across my shirt and arms. Pretty much what I asked for. “This is what the prairie used to be,” a silver-haired ranger had promised, pointing to the northeast corner of South Dakota’s Wind Cave National Park—away from the hordes lining up to go on tours of one of the world’s biggest cave systems. After brushing the bugs off, like you see pioneer types do in Oregon Trail movies, I feel at ease in the mixed-grass prairie playland. (The ranger later could only guess they were springtail fleas,…
  • Meet Wyoming’s Bighorn

    Robert Reid
    8 Sep 2014 | 11:48 am
    “Everything’s better in the mountains. Chicken soup, coffee with the grounds in it. It’s just better up here.” Scott Schroder has spots of gray in his big red beard, and wet pants. That’s only because he decided against waders and is walking in jeans through the knee-deep South Fork of the Tongue River. He’s leading me on a fly-fishing lesson for the day, and our conversation could fill an open range. As I occasionally tangle my line in a riverside tree branch, we chat high school football, rhythm guitars, Sweden, speed limits, our late dads, Hemingway, and a few things about…
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