National Geographic

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  • David Gruber: Seeing the Ocean in Neon

    National Geographic News: Animals
    Susan Daugherty
    24 Oct 2014 | 2:51 pm
    The marine biologist discovered a world of glowing ocean creatures, never before seen by the human eye.
  • Highest Stone Age Campsite Reveals Grit of First Americans

    National Geographic News: Ancient World
    Dan Vergano
    23 Oct 2014 | 11:03 am
    Even without genetic adaptations to altitude, early hunters moved high into the Andes soon after people first reached South America.
  • Social Media Abuzz with Amazing Snapshots of Partial Solar Eclipse

    National Geographic News: Space and Tech
    Andrew Fazekas
    24 Oct 2014 | 3:57 pm
    The moon took a bite out of the sun on Thursday for an exciting few hours. See the results.
  • Success

    National Geographic Photo of the Day
    USER ID: 1889
    23 Oct 2014 | 9:00 pm
    An Atlantic puffin returns from a successful fishing expedition in this picture captured in Iceland. A puffin can grip 20 or more fish in its beak. Those with chicks make up to eight food runs a day. This photo was submitted to the 2014 National Geographic Photo Contest. Download wallpaper » See all contest entries » Browse galleries of our editors' favorites »
  • Louisiana, Three Ways: Creole Country

    Intelligent Travel
    Andrew Nelson
    24 Oct 2014 | 12:57 pm
    [Read Louisiana, Three Ways: NOLA] I’m in Killer Poboys to meet with Charles Chamberlain, a Ph.D. in American history and local History Man. Ten years a historian at the Louisiana State Museum before setting up his own company, Historia, to provide outsiders insights into the Pelican State, Chamberlain knows Louisiana. He’s just the guy, I figure, to explain why Louisiana is so different, even a little cray cray—and I don’t mean the fish. “Louisiana couldn’t be anything but,” he declares as we share a bag of Zapp’s Voodoo Potato Chips, a favorite Louisiana…
 
 
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    National Geographic Photo of the Day

  • Success

    USER ID: 1889
    23 Oct 2014 | 9:00 pm
    An Atlantic puffin returns from a successful fishing expedition in this picture captured in Iceland. A puffin can grip 20 or more fish in its beak. Those with chicks make up to eight food runs a day. This photo was submitted to the 2014 National Geographic Photo Contest. Download wallpaper » See all contest entries » Browse galleries of our editors' favorites »
  • Morning Java

    USER ID: 2268435
    22 Oct 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Photographer Achmad Sumawijaya waited three hours to capture this picture of Mount Bromo (in foreground) and Mount Semeru (in background) on a misty morning in East Java, Indonesia. Some Indonesians believe that the volcanoes are portals to a subterranean world. This photo was submitted to the 2014 National Geographic Photo Contest. Download wallpaper » See all contest entries » Browse galleries of our editors' favorites »
  • Near and Far

    USER ID: 2773931
    21 Oct 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Elephants appear to patrol the Serengeti in this picture taken in Tanzania. A recent study found that ivory-seeking poachers have killed 100,000 African elephants in just three years. During 2011 alone, roughly one of every twelve African elephants was killed by a poacher. Demand for ivory, most notably in China and elsewhere in Asia, has helped keep black market prices high. This photo was submitted to the 2014 National Geographic Photo Contest. Download wallpaper » See all contest entries » Browse galleries of our editors' favorites »
  • Napoleon Invasion

    USER ID: 510024
    20 Oct 2014 | 9:00 pm
    A humphead wrasse, also known as a Napoleon wrasse, builds a living frame as it swims through a school of fish in the waters off Australia. Photographer Christian Miller captured the shot on a windy day right after a cyclone had passed the far northern Great Barrier Reef. “Never before [had I seen] that many glass fish on this particular coral bommie [outcrop],” he writes. This photo was submitted to the 2014 National Geographic Photo Contest. Download wallpaper » See all contest entries » Browse galleries of our editors' favorites »
  • Tottori Sand Dunes

    19 Oct 2014 | 9:00 pm
    The Tottori sand dunes—the largest in Japan—rise toward the horizon in the country’s south. The coastal dunes were formed by sand and wind over 100,000 years. In the distance, lighted squid-fishing boats bob on the Sea of Japan. This photo was submitted to the 2014 National Geographic Photo Contest. Download wallpaper » See all contest entries » Browse galleries of our editors' favorites »
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    Intelligent Travel

  • Louisiana, Three Ways: Creole Country

    Andrew Nelson
    24 Oct 2014 | 12:57 pm
    [Read Louisiana, Three Ways: NOLA] I’m in Killer Poboys to meet with Charles Chamberlain, a Ph.D. in American history and local History Man. Ten years a historian at the Louisiana State Museum before setting up his own company, Historia, to provide outsiders insights into the Pelican State, Chamberlain knows Louisiana. He’s just the guy, I figure, to explain why Louisiana is so different, even a little cray cray—and I don’t mean the fish. “Louisiana couldn’t be anything but,” he declares as we share a bag of Zapp’s Voodoo Potato Chips, a favorite Louisiana…
  • A Metamorphosis in Prague

    Intelligent Travel
    24 Oct 2014 | 8:45 am
    I was working on an animated film in Los Angeles in 1982 when I was ordered back to Prague by the communist Czech government. I wanted to finish my film and was tired of the government telling me what to do, so I decided not to return even though I knew this meant I might not see my family again. Then, in 1989, I became a U.S. citizen, and a few months later the Berlin Wall fell. I could once again go home. Whenever I visit, I try to swim against time, not to recall the oppressive fortress that used to be Prague but to reconnect with the favorite places of my childhood. Our family home is…
  • The New World of Travel Writing

    Don George
    23 Oct 2014 | 2:21 pm
    As a writer, editor, and teacher, I care about travel writing that matters. My own journey of learning about and reflecting on the ever-evolving world of travel writing and publishing is a continual one, propelled each year by the Book Passage Travel Writers and Photographers Conference, held each summer in the Bay Area, where I live. Even more recently, I was thrilled to attend the Melbourne Writers Festival and TBEX travel bloggers gathering as a guest speaker—where the conversation gained momentum. One of my prime lessons this year has been the fact that today, what might be called…
  • Five UFO Hot Spots in the American Southwest

    Intelligent Travel
    23 Oct 2014 | 10:19 am
    The dramatic geology and wide-open spaces of the American Southwest lend themselves to UFO activity—imaginary or real—making it one of the top spots for sightings. Roswell, New Mexico, may be the most notable name in extraterrestrial lore, but there are plenty of other hot spots in the region that deserve honorable mentions. Here are five: 1. Marfa, Texas On a desert plateau in western Texas, the town of Marfa is known for the Marfa Lights—reddish-orange spheres that are three to six feet (one to three meters) in diameter and travel at high speed. They are said to glow like a…
  • I Heart My City: Hannah’s Phnom Penh

    I Heart My City
    22 Oct 2014 | 12:57 pm
    Nat Geo Young Explorer Hannah Reyes is a photographer and travel enthusiast whose work has taken her to the unlikeliest of places to document threatened indigenous cultures. After growing up in the Philippine capital, Manila, she chose a similarly chaotic city in Cambodia—Phnom Penh—as her new home base. With its rich history and its diverse landscapes, Hannah says, “those who decide to take a close look at this changing place enjoy the reward of discovering its wonderful secrets.” Here are a few of her favorite things about the city she calls home. Learn more about…
 
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