National Geographic

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  • Convicted Drug Dealer Indicted for Selling Rhino Horns

    National Geographic News: Animals
    Bryan Christy
    17 Apr 2014 | 2:08 pm
    U.S. undercover investigation nets an alleged rhino horn trafficker with ties to former Medellín drug cartel.
  • Rescue of Ancient Ruin of Pompeii Follows New Plan

    National Geographic News: Ancient World
    Dan Vergano
    18 Apr 2014 | 7:25 am
    The ancient town destroyed by Vesuvius is undergoing renewed rescue efforts.
  • Proposed Mars Missions Challenge NASA Health Standards, Panel Warns

    National Geographic News: Space and Tech
    Dan Vergano
    2 Apr 2014 | 8:00 am
    Mars and asteroid trips will entail higher levels of health risk on their voyages compared to previous explorers, a bioethics panel warns.
  • Plum Beautiful

    National Geographic Photo of the Day
    USER ID: 2422583
    17 Apr 2014 | 9:00 pm
    "There is a culture around the cherry blossoms in spring in Japan, especially strong now," says Hideyuki Katagiri, who submitted this picture of a plum grove on Mount Takao to the National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest. "But to me, the plum blossoms make me feel the coming of the season. This beautiful early morning light on the trees [seems to create] an explosion of spring." This photo was submitted to the 2014 National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest. Download wallpapers » See all entries »
  • Wilderness Cannot Be Restored Or Recreated. Only Destroyed.

    News Watch
    Steve Boyes
    18 Apr 2014 | 6:09 am
    “Wilderness cannot be restored or recreated. Only destroyed. We are just about to lose our last glimpses into prehistory that connect us to eternity and remember a time before modern man.” (Steve Boyes) Africa’s last-remaining wetland wilderness, Botswana’s Okavango Delta, depends on pristine floodwaters from the world’s largest undeveloped river catchment, the Kavango Basin, in Angola and Namibia. Irrigation schemes, rice, mining, dams, logging, plantations, charcoal, settlements, bushmeat, and hydro-electric weirs in the remote catchment are coming with (and most likely…
 
 
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    National Geographic Photo of the Day

  • Plum Beautiful

    USER ID: 2422583
    17 Apr 2014 | 9:00 pm
    "There is a culture around the cherry blossoms in spring in Japan, especially strong now," says Hideyuki Katagiri, who submitted this picture of a plum grove on Mount Takao to the National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest. "But to me, the plum blossoms make me feel the coming of the season. This beautiful early morning light on the trees [seems to create] an explosion of spring." This photo was submitted to the 2014 National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest. Download wallpapers » See all entries »
  • Ice Baby

    16 Apr 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Born on the ice, a harp seal pup peers underwater near Quebec’s Madeleine Islands. The islands are among the hosts of wildlife—including fish, birds, and marine mammals—in and around the Gulf of St. Lawrence. See more pictures from the May 2014 feature story “The Generous Gulf.” Listen to David Doubilet speak about underwater photography »
  • Fête de la Mare

    Carolyn Jackson_2013
    15 Apr 2014 | 9:00 pm
    "I was working on a one-year assignment in Diankana, Guinea, a village on a tributary of the Niger River," says Your Shot contributor Sarah Jackson. "I had not been in the country very long before I began hearing about the annual Fête de la Mare (Festival of the Pond), which occurs in many villages throughout the eastern part of the country, where the Malinke culture predominates. This festival celebrates fishing and always takes place at the end of the hot season, when the water level of nearby ponds is at its lowest and the fish are easy to catch. Everyone waits at the water's edge for the…
  • Two Different Lives

    14 Apr 2014 | 9:00 pm
    "I was traveling between the European and Asian sides of Istanbul, Turkey, by ferry," says Your Shot contributor Merve Ates. "I was sitting on seats outside, accompanied on my journey by seagulls. The boy on the right was sitting next to me. I was listening to the screaming of the seagulls and smelling the sea air and taking several shots but also waiting for a particularly interesting moment, and suddenly I noticed the window reflection. It seemed like the man and the boy were sitting side by side. In reality, the old man was reading the Koran, while the young boy had a worried look on his…
  • In a Fog

    13 Apr 2014 | 9:00 pm
    “I always say that the best things happen unexpectedly and spontaneously,” says Antic Zlatko, a member of our Your Shot community who captured this scene on the Tamiš River near his home in Pančevo, Serbia. “It was taken on a cold winter day, but the ambience was magic—the cold afternoon with the fog and the sun [shining] over it. I saw this through the window and had afterward gone on a walk with my kids. I made a few shots but I think this one shows the true ambience.” Zlatko’s picture was featured in the Your Shot Daily Dozen. This photo was submitted to Your Shot. Check out…
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    News Watch

  • Wilderness Cannot Be Restored Or Recreated. Only Destroyed.

    Steve Boyes
    18 Apr 2014 | 6:09 am
    “Wilderness cannot be restored or recreated. Only destroyed. We are just about to lose our last glimpses into prehistory that connect us to eternity and remember a time before modern man.” (Steve Boyes) Africa’s last-remaining wetland wilderness, Botswana’s Okavango Delta, depends on pristine floodwaters from the world’s largest undeveloped river catchment, the Kavango Basin, in Angola and Namibia. Irrigation schemes, rice, mining, dams, logging, plantations, charcoal, settlements, bushmeat, and hydro-electric weirs in the remote catchment are coming with (and most likely…
  • New Killer Sponges Found in the Deep Sea

    Carrie Arnold
    18 Apr 2014 | 5:00 am
    Four new species of meat-eating sponges have been discovered deep in the waters off California, a new study says. There are about 8,500 species of sponges, a type of simple, mostly stationary invertebrate, and the vast majority passively filter their food on the seafloor. But in the past two decades, scientists have found 7 species of carnivorous sponges that attack prey—and the new discoveries bump that number to 11, said Lonny Lundsten, a biologist at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute.  A. monticola, a new species of carnivorous sponge, uses hooks to trap tiny…
  • Federal Appeals Court Upholds EPA Mercury Rule

    Tim Profeta
    17 Apr 2014 | 2:00 pm
    A federal appeals court upheld the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS) requiring power plants install technology to cut emissions of mercury and other air pollutants. MATS was challenged by industry and several states that argued the EPA should have considered costs when determining whether it was “appropriate and necessary” to go forward with the standards. The EPA contended the rule was required under the Clean Air Act. “On its face,” the majority opinion said, the Clean Air Act “neither requires EPA to consider costs nor…
  • The Penan Hunter-Gatherers of Sarawak

    Joanna Eede
    17 Apr 2014 | 11:19 am
    Photograph by Julien Coquentin For the Penan of Sarawak’s rainforest, the raucous call of the white-crowned hornbill has long heralded dawn. Today, however, they are just as likely to be woken by the sound of chainsaws and falling trees. The tropical rainforest of Sarawak in Borneo, East Malaysia, is one of the most biologically rich forests on earth. It is also home to the Penan people, one of the last hunter-gatherer tribes in Malaysia; they have lived in harmony with the rainforest, with its fast-flowing rivers and twisting networks of limestone caves, for thousands of years.
  • World’s First Female “Penis” Found, in Cave-Dwelling Bugs

    Sandeep Ravindran
    17 Apr 2014 | 11:01 am
    Scientists have discovered the first female “penis” in the animal kingdom, a new study says. Four new species of Brazilian cave-dwelling bugs have sex-reversed genitalia, so that the female uses her elaborate penis-like organ to penetrate the male’s vagina-like opening and collect his sperm. (Related: “Wild Romance: Weird Animal Courtship and Mating Rituals.”) A female in the newfound species N. curvet (top) mates with a male. Photograph by Yoshizawa Kazunori “There’s nothing that [this] can be compared to,” said study co-author Rodrigo…
 
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    Intelligent Travel

  • I Heart My National Park: Yellowstone

    I Heart My National Park
    18 Apr 2014 | 8:54 am
    There are few people living who know Yellowstone better than Jeremy Schmidt. The Jackson Hole-based writer and photographer has spent 40 years as a ranger, “winterkeeper,” and guide in the park. The author of more than a dozen books, Schmidt is a long-time contributor to National Geographic magazine, and a popular trip leader and expert for National Geographic Expeditions. Here’s his insider’s guide to America’s very first national park. Yellowstone is My National Park  Autumn is the best time to visit because large animals like elk and bison are in their prime…
  • Travel Legends: Q + A With Paul Theroux

    Leslie Trew Magraw
    17 Apr 2014 | 2:46 pm
    Paul Theroux has been charming readers–and rooting out surprising adventures in far-flung places–for more than half a century. Known for his fondness for train travel, love-hate relationship with Africa, and literary panache, the veteran travel writer and novelist, now 73, continues to share his global insights with the world. Theroux’s most recent book, The Last Train to Zona Verde, may seem like a fitting bookend to the book that kickstarted his career, but I have a feeling we’ll be hearing from this literary legend for years to come. When Theroux stopped by…
  • Road Tripping the Florida Keys

    Annie Fitzsimmons
    17 Apr 2014 | 2:10 pm
    I set off from Miami without an agenda. I was headed south to Key West on the famous Overseas Highway and wanted to let serendipity lead the way. With only a short amount of time on my hands, I didn’t want to be saddled with an endless list of to-dos. Here’s what I found on my road trip through this idiosyncratic island paradise: > Coral Castle Museum The drive from Miami to Key Largo is generally uneventful, but you can veer off and stop at the Coral Castle Museum, a roadside curiosity borne of one man’s brilliant eccentricity. Ed Leedskalnin reportedly spent 28 years of…
  • I Heart My City: Sharada’s Hyderabad

    I Heart My City
    16 Apr 2014 | 12:42 pm
    When Sharada Annamaraju moved to Hyderabad as a teenager, it wasn’t exactly love at first sight. But time and distance can change a person. Eight years (and one language learned) later, she decided to give the capital of Andhra Pradesh in southern India another chance. This time, sparks flew, and she isn’t leaving anytime soon. Here are a few of Sharada’s favorite things about the place she calls home. Follow Sharada on Twitter at @suitcaseindian Hyderabad is My City When someone comes to visit me, the first place I take them is to the Old City to get a crash course on…
  • #NGTRadar: Travel Lately

    Intelligent Travel
    16 Apr 2014 | 11:02 am
    The Radar–the best of the travel blogosphere–is a regular feature on Intelligent Travel every other Wednesday. You can play, too. Follow us on Twitter @NatGeoTravel and tag your favorite travel stories #NGTRadar to help us find the crème de la crème on the Web. Here are our latest picks: When you hear the phrase “capital city,” you may picture skyscrapers, shutter-bugging tourists, and frenetic workaday hordes. None of those stereotypes ring true in Vientiane. And that isn’t necessarily a bad thing. The beautiful wats and laid-back pace of Laos’ biggest…
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    Digital Nomad

  • Route 66: The Mother Road

    Andrew Evans
    17 Apr 2014 | 2:20 am
    There’s a piece of the road in the museum—square slabs of aged asphalt excised from west of Oklahoma City. I’ve never seen such a thing in a museum.  I have seen shrunken human heads and Tyrannosaurus teeth, polished suits of armor and a queen’s underpants, but never before have I seen a chunk of road lying in a museum like a framed work of art. I stare at the little bits of broken stone, forever frozen in the flattened pavement and wonder, how many cars passed over this spot? How many Midwestern thunderstorms rained down into those microscopic holes, how many ’57 Chevy’s and…
  • My Next Big Trip(s)!

    Andrew Evans
    7 Apr 2014 | 8:35 am
    Long before I ever jet set to London or Tokyo, and long before I sailed the oceans or bussed to Antarctica, I went on road trips, with my parents. Every summer we set off in our family van, rolling from one rest stop to the next, on to national parks and the beach and the mountains, discovering the vastness and wonder of America, mile by mile. For sure, road tripping across America is how I learned to travel and how I fell in love with my own country. I learned to drive a standard transmission coasting the endless horizon of Nebraska. Road trips also taught me how to change a tire, what bison…
  • Havana Harleys

    Andrew Evans
    4 Apr 2014 | 9:26 am
    Two flags hang in the garage: Cuba on the left, America on the right. In the middle of our group stands Luis Enrique González, dressed in a black Harley-Davidson T-shirt, his hair wrapped in a black bandana. Oversized motorcycles from yesteryear stand parked in a row—some red, one bright turquoise. “This one’s from 1938,” explains Luis. “And it still runs!” His eyes sparkle with pride as our group gasps with surprise. We are Americans, and we are used to things being new. In our world, a 1999 Subaru is both ancient and unsustainable. But here in Cuba, engineers like Luis take…
  • Photo Gallery: Havana

    Andrew Evans
    2 Apr 2014 | 9:47 am
    This National Geographic Expeditions Cuba Trip has offered a spectacular opportunity to meet Cubans on their home turf and share with them our own impressions of their country. Though we explored several other areas in Cuba, we began and ended our expedition in the capital, Havana. With 2.2 million inhabitants, it’s impossible to caption this diverse and colorful city, but this handful of photos offers a little peek at the beauty of Havana and those who live there. This trip is one of the many ways to travel with National Geographic Expeditions. To learn more about all of our travel…
  • Chess With Hector

    Andrew Evans
    1 Apr 2014 | 5:26 am
    We were walking in the same direction, but going different places. The old man carried a folded cloth sack, and I had my camera bag flung over one shoulder. He said hello first, and I reached out to shake his hand. His skin was mocha brown and paper thin—his body frail and his hair as white as a dove. The afternoon was hot but the sun had passed its zenith, painting the pastel walls of Havana in warm yellow light. Side by side, we walked down Obispo, maneuvering around potholes and passing construction workers in dusty boots. Teeth-rattling jackhammers stabbed the street and made it…
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    News Watch

  • Wilderness Cannot Be Restored Or Recreated. Only Destroyed.

    Steve Boyes
    18 Apr 2014 | 6:09 am
    “Wilderness cannot be restored or recreated. Only destroyed. We are just about to lose our last glimpses into prehistory that connect us to eternity and remember a time before modern man.” (Steve Boyes) Africa’s last-remaining wetland wilderness, Botswana’s Okavango Delta, depends on pristine floodwaters from the world’s largest undeveloped river catchment, the Kavango Basin, in Angola and Namibia. Irrigation schemes, rice, mining, dams, logging, plantations, charcoal, settlements, bushmeat, and hydro-electric weirs in the remote catchment are coming with (and most likely…
  • New Killer Sponges Found in the Deep Sea

    Carrie Arnold
    18 Apr 2014 | 5:00 am
    Four new species of meat-eating sponges have been discovered deep in the waters off California, a new study says. There are about 8,500 species of sponges, a type of simple, mostly stationary invertebrate, and the vast majority passively filter their food on the seafloor. But in the past two decades, scientists have found 7 species of carnivorous sponges that attack prey—and the new discoveries bump that number to 11, said Lonny Lundsten, a biologist at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute.  A. monticola, a new species of carnivorous sponge, uses hooks to trap tiny…
  • Federal Appeals Court Upholds EPA Mercury Rule

    Tim Profeta
    17 Apr 2014 | 2:00 pm
    A federal appeals court upheld the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS) requiring power plants install technology to cut emissions of mercury and other air pollutants. MATS was challenged by industry and several states that argued the EPA should have considered costs when determining whether it was “appropriate and necessary” to go forward with the standards. The EPA contended the rule was required under the Clean Air Act. “On its face,” the majority opinion said, the Clean Air Act “neither requires EPA to consider costs nor…
  • The Penan Hunter-Gatherers of Sarawak

    Joanna Eede
    17 Apr 2014 | 11:19 am
    Photograph by Julien Coquentin For the Penan of Sarawak’s rainforest, the raucous call of the white-crowned hornbill has long heralded dawn. Today, however, they are just as likely to be woken by the sound of chainsaws and falling trees. The tropical rainforest of Sarawak in Borneo, East Malaysia, is one of the most biologically rich forests on earth. It is also home to the Penan people, one of the last hunter-gatherer tribes in Malaysia; they have lived in harmony with the rainforest, with its fast-flowing rivers and twisting networks of limestone caves, for thousands of years.
  • World’s First Female “Penis” Found, in Cave-Dwelling Bugs

    Sandeep Ravindran
    17 Apr 2014 | 11:01 am
    Scientists have discovered the first female “penis” in the animal kingdom, a new study says. Four new species of Brazilian cave-dwelling bugs have sex-reversed genitalia, so that the female uses her elaborate penis-like organ to penetrate the male’s vagina-like opening and collect his sperm. (Related: “Wild Romance: Weird Animal Courtship and Mating Rituals.”) A female in the newfound species N. curvet (top) mates with a male. Photograph by Yoshizawa Kazunori “There’s nothing that [this] can be compared to,” said study co-author Rodrigo…
 
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