National Geographic

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  • Gobi Bears

    National Geographic News: Animals
    Douglas Chadwick
    21 Apr 2014 | 7:19 am
    Fewer than three dozen of the desert-dwelling Gobi bears survive in one of the harshest places on Earth.
  • Pompeii "Exposed and Vulnerable" to Neglect and the Elements

    National Geographic News: Ancient World
    Eve Conant
    20 Apr 2014 | 5:32 am
    In her new book, Ingrid D. Rowland explains of abiding allure of Pompeii over the centuries and laments the effects of neglect and the weather.
  • Proposed Mars Missions Challenge NASA Health Standards, Panel Warns

    National Geographic News: Space and Tech
    Dan Vergano
    2 Apr 2014 | 8:00 am
    Mars and asteroid trips will entail higher levels of health risk on their voyages compared to previous explorers, a bioethics panel warns.
  • Rock of Ages

    National Geographic Photo of the Day
    USER ID: 2680422
    22 Apr 2014 | 9:00 pm
    After a heavy thunderstorm, a small pond grants a mirror reflection of a hiker at the Wave, the most famous landform in Vermilion Cliffs National Monument in Arizona and Utah. Says Nicholas Roemmelt, who submitted this picture to the National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest, it was "a calm and solemn place on a perfect day." This photo and caption were submitted to the 2014 National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest. Download wallpapers » See all entries »
  • What’s Making Duck Sounds in the Ocean? Mystery Solved

    News Watch
    Carrie Arnold
    23 Apr 2014 | 10:53 am
    It may sound quacky, but mysterious duck-like sounds in the oceans are made by whales, a new study says. Scientists have been trying to decode the perplexing low-frequency sounds, which occur every summer in the ocean around Antarctica, since sonar began detecting them in the 1960s. An Antarctic minke whale swims near Boothe Island in the Lemaire Channel, Antarctica. Photograph by Paul Souders, Corbis “’Bio-duck’ was actually a fitting description for the sound. It really does sound a lot like a duck,” said study leader Denise Risch, a marine acoustic specialist at the U.S.
 
 
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    National Geographic Photo of the Day

  • Rock of Ages

    USER ID: 2680422
    22 Apr 2014 | 9:00 pm
    After a heavy thunderstorm, a small pond grants a mirror reflection of a hiker at the Wave, the most famous landform in Vermilion Cliffs National Monument in Arizona and Utah. Says Nicholas Roemmelt, who submitted this picture to the National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest, it was "a calm and solemn place on a perfect day." This photo and caption were submitted to the 2014 National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest. Download wallpapers » See all entries »
  • Tunnel Vision

    USER ID: 1652592
    21 Apr 2014 | 9:00 pm
    "In the last ten years, mobile data, smartphones, and social networks have forever changed our existence," writes Brian Yen, who submitted this picture of an Ocean Park Hong Kong tram to the National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest. "Although this woman stood at the center of a jam-packed train, the warm glow from her phone told the strangers around her that she wasn't really there. She managed to slip away for a short moment, a node flickering on the social web, roaming the Earth, free as a butterfly. Our existence is no longer stuck to the physical here—we're free to run away, and run…
  • Bonne Bay Drift

    20 Apr 2014 | 9:00 pm
    A lion’s mane jellyfish drifts in Bonne Bay in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The species can grow to eight feet across. Years of overfishing, warming waters, and possible offshore drilling cause concern for the health of the gulf's ecosystem. See more pictures from the May 2014 feature story “The Generous Gulf.” Listen to David Doubilet speak about being an underwater photographer »
  • Skyfall

    19 Apr 2014 | 9:00 pm
    "I always like to travel in the Himalaya," says Your Shot contributor Jayanta Roy. "This photo is a previsualization; I had wanted to capture a rain of stars over Kanchenjunga for a long time, so I chose the location and timing, which is at almost midnight. It was bone-chilling, the wind was so strong and cold. The location is a tiny village called Lungtung in eastern India, population ten." Roy took a few test shots and changed location a few times to add the tree and place Kanchenjunga exactly in the middle of the frame. The picture was recently published in the Your Shot Daily Dozen. This…
  • Mise-en-Seine

    18 Apr 2014 | 9:00 pm
    The Seine is the liquid heart of Paris—a conduit of commerce, a source of inspiration for artists, and a dreamlike backdrop for romance in settings provided by the dinner boat Le Calife. See more photos from the May 2014 feature story “Love and Loss on the Seine.” Listen to William Allard speak about his passion for photography »
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    News Watch

  • What’s Making Duck Sounds in the Ocean? Mystery Solved

    Carrie Arnold
    23 Apr 2014 | 10:53 am
    It may sound quacky, but mysterious duck-like sounds in the oceans are made by whales, a new study says. Scientists have been trying to decode the perplexing low-frequency sounds, which occur every summer in the ocean around Antarctica, since sonar began detecting them in the 1960s. An Antarctic minke whale swims near Boothe Island in the Lemaire Channel, Antarctica. Photograph by Paul Souders, Corbis “’Bio-duck’ was actually a fitting description for the sound. It really does sound a lot like a duck,” said study leader Denise Risch, a marine acoustic specialist at the U.S.
  • Fish and Cattle Fans Cooperate in Klamath Basin

    Bev Gabe
    23 Apr 2014 | 9:43 am
    In 2008, LightHawk supported water sharing in the Klamath River Basin with a blitz of local flights. Today, we applaud tribes and ranchers who signed an agreement to share water in the upper reaches of the Basin by looking back at those early flights. The two groups are working together to sustain the future for the fish and cattle so closely tied to their identities. LightHawk volunteer pilot Jane Nicolai (left) poses with her passengers including a local rancher, media and a wildlife biologist. image: Greg Bedinger/LightHawk Six years ago, volunteer pilots, conservation partners and…
  • Q&A: What Can Dog Brains Tell Us About Humans?

    James Owen
    23 Apr 2014 | 7:10 am
    Dogs have a human side. That’s not just their mushy-eyed owners talking, but scientists who study the companionable canines we’ve lived alongside for 30,000 years or more.  Indeed, such is our mental bond with the earliest domesticated animal that researchers are turning to them as models to gain insights into the workings and maladies of the human brain. (See “OCD Dogs, People Have Similar Brains; Is Your Dog OCD?”) Dogs (pictured, a border collie) are great research subjects. Photograph by Vincent J. Musi, National Geographic A scientist whose pioneering work with dogs…
  • Hagfish Slime Could Be Eco-Friendly Fabric

    Guest Blogger
    22 Apr 2014 | 11:41 am
    By Rachel Kaufman Many people are disgusted by the hagfish. These squirmy, eel-looking creatures are known primarily for two repellent traits: eating dying animals from the inside out, and oozing four cups of slime in a fraction of a second. But Douglas Fudge, an integrative biologist at Canada’s University of Guelph, in Ontario, has given us a reason to embrace the goo: It may one day be used to produce a strong, eco-friendly fabric. The recent study by Fudge and colleagues, published April 15 in the Journal of Experimental Biology, has revealed that different hagfish species have…
  • Saving Goat Islands, Jamaica

    International League of Conservation Photographers
    22 Apr 2014 | 10:11 am
    Text and photos by Robin Moore, Fellow at the International League of Conservation Photographers Guardian of the Reptiles “You’ve got to respect another life, so that the other life can respect yours,” says Booms, whose real name is Mr. Kenroy Williams, a young Jamaican who has devoted the past seven years of his life to protecting some of the rarest reptiles in the world, and the largest living land animal in the country; the critically endangered Jamaican iguana. “Some of my friends think I am crazy, when they hear that I am touching the iguanas and the crocodiles. But if they were…
 
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    Intelligent Travel

  • Travel Talk: Ocean Hero Enric Sala

    Megan Heltzel
    22 Apr 2014 | 1:12 pm
    Enric Sala is a man on a mission. Leaving behind a tenured position at prestigious Scripps Institution of Oceanography, the audacious marine ecologist showed up at Nat Geo’s doorstep to outline his vision for protecting the last wild places in the ocean. That was more than five years ago. Today, with support from the Society as an explorer-in-residence, Sala remains the dynamic driving force behind the Pristine Seas project, an epic effort to establish marine reserves–underwater national parks–around the world. I recently got the chance to chat with the accomplished diver…
  • A Perfect Day in San Diego

    Annie Fitzsimmons
    22 Apr 2014 | 12:20 pm
    When I know I’m going on a trip, I immediately start canvassing my network of friends, writers, and editors around the world for advice about what to see and do. So when I knew I’d be heading to San Diego, I went straight to National Geographic Travel’s digital director, Carolyn Fox, who grew up a few miles north of the city, in Del Mar. After talking, we thought it might be fun to show two sides: her idea of a perfect day in San Diego County–starting in Encinitas and ending up in the city proper–and what I found along the way as a visitor armed with her…
  • Reader Recs: Favorite National Parks

    Megan Heltzel
    21 Apr 2014 | 2:09 pm
    The beauty of America’s 59 national parks is hard to put into words. From the crystal clear waters of Glacier to the breathtaking enormity of the Grand Tetons, it’s something you should experience firsthand–and this is the perfect time to do it. Why? It’s National Park Week. To pay homage to the natural splendor of America’s best idea (a paraphrase of legendary author and environmentalist Wallace Stegner’s comment in 1983 that “national parks are the best idea we ever had. Absolutely American, absolutely democratic, they reflect us at our…
  • Design Dream: Cape Town

    Intelligent Travel
    21 Apr 2014 | 7:05 am
    In a nod to the renaissance transforming South Africa, 
Cape Town has been crowned the World Design Capital of 2014. The art scene here particularly flourishes in the neighborhood of Woodstock, a historically industrial quarter along a shabby stretch of the city’s eastern fringes. Revamped heritage buildings hum with galleries, vintage shops, restaurants, and working ateliers. “I love the energy,” says chef Luke Dale-Roberts, who opened his top-rated Test Kitchen and Pot Luck Club restaurants in Woodstock’s Old Biscuit Mill, with views of Table Mountain from the top…
  • I Heart My National Park: Yellowstone

    I Heart My National Park
    18 Apr 2014 | 8:54 am
    There are few people living who know Yellowstone better than Jeremy Schmidt. The Jackson Hole, Wyoming-based writer and photographer has spent 40 years as a ranger, “winterkeeper,” and guide in the park. The author of more than a dozen books, Schmidt is a longtime contributor to National Geographic magazine and a popular trip leader and expert for National Geographic Expeditions. Here’s his insider’s guide to America’s very first national park. Yellowstone Is My National Park  Autumn is the best time to visit because large animals like elk and bison are in…
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    Digital Nomad

  • Route 66: Bent Bridge

    Andrew Evans
    22 Apr 2014 | 6:45 am
    The Illinois road ends on an island in the stream—a sandy, almond-shaped isle covered with tall and unbending trees. The first bridge is just one lane, so I wait for the light to change green, then rumble up and over the water onto the island. The second bridge is now closed to auto traffic, so I park in the empty lot and travel the next length of Route 66 on foot. The old Chain of Rocks Bridge was built across the Mississippi River in 1929, but only joined Route 66 in 1936. The art of old engineering stands triumphant in a web of naked steel girders, angled up against the fading spring…
  • Route 66: Lincoln’s Nose

    Andrew Evans
    21 Apr 2014 | 7:14 am
    The Lincolns are having ham for dinner, which makes sense, because tomorrow is Easter. The pink plastic pork sits on an antique platter, surrounded by a dozen buttery biscuits fashioned from polyvinyl chloride. They look delicious. Seventy-five percent of the home is original, but the black silk top hat hanging in the hallway is not. “Only three of Lincoln’s original hats remain in existence,” says the national parks ranger, “And one of them is right here, in Springfield, Illinois—at Lincoln’s Presidential Library.” He moves us on to the next room, affecting a jarring southern…
  • Route 66: Pit-Stop in Pontiac

    Andrew Evans
    19 Apr 2014 | 8:13 am
    “So, what do you remember about the road?” I ask. “Traffic!” laughs Jim, and the rest of the table echoes the word. “Traffic and more traffic! Real busy,” they add. “Narrow as hell,” says Harv, and his eyes stop, thinking back to that time in his life traveling down a road that no longer exists. “Lots of traffic” and “narrow as hell” are the first eyewitness accounts I’ve heard in relation to the original Route 66. The Apple Tree Cafe in Pontiac, Illinois, right on Route 66. (Photo by Andrew Evans, National Geographic Travel) The five older men in flannel occupy the…
  • Route 66: Leaving Chicago

    Andrew Evans
    18 Apr 2014 | 12:40 pm
    I wanted a convertible— —a  red vintage convertible with shiny chrome rims and white leather seats. But the Enterprise at O’Hare didn’t have any of those. “You wanna Impala?” The guy asked, but it was white—and I’m allergic to renting white cars. One day on the road and white cars start looking like dirty underwear. I futzed around the lot, disappointed. If I couldn’t motor down Route 66 in something vintage and cool, I needed to at least roll in something American. I passed over the BMW’s and then salivated over the midnight-black Mustangs (“You’re not authorized to…
  • Route 66: The Mother Road

    Andrew Evans
    17 Apr 2014 | 2:20 am
    There’s a piece of the road in the museum—square slabs of aged asphalt excised from west of Oklahoma City. I’ve never seen such a thing in a museum.  I have seen shrunken human heads and Tyrannosaurus teeth, polished suits of armor and a queen’s underpants, but never before have I seen a chunk of road lying in a museum like a framed work of art. I stare at the little bits of broken stone, forever frozen in the flattened pavement and wonder, how many cars passed over this spot? How many Midwestern thunderstorms rained down into those microscopic holes, how many ’57 Chevy’s and…
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    News Watch

  • What’s Making Duck Sounds in the Ocean? Mystery Solved

    Carrie Arnold
    23 Apr 2014 | 10:53 am
    It may sound quacky, but mysterious duck-like sounds in the oceans are made by whales, a new study says. Scientists have been trying to decode the perplexing low-frequency sounds, which occur every summer in the ocean around Antarctica, since sonar began detecting them in the 1960s. An Antarctic minke whale swims near Boothe Island in the Lemaire Channel, Antarctica. Photograph by Paul Souders, Corbis “’Bio-duck’ was actually a fitting description for the sound. It really does sound a lot like a duck,” said study leader Denise Risch, a marine acoustic specialist at the U.S.
  • Fish and Cattle Fans Cooperate in Klamath Basin

    Bev Gabe
    23 Apr 2014 | 9:43 am
    In 2008, LightHawk supported water sharing in the Klamath River Basin with a blitz of local flights. Today, we applaud tribes and ranchers who signed an agreement to share water in the upper reaches of the Basin by looking back at those early flights. The two groups are working together to sustain the future for the fish and cattle so closely tied to their identities. LightHawk volunteer pilot Jane Nicolai (left) poses with her passengers including a local rancher, media and a wildlife biologist. image: Greg Bedinger/LightHawk Six years ago, volunteer pilots, conservation partners and…
  • Q&A: What Can Dog Brains Tell Us About Humans?

    James Owen
    23 Apr 2014 | 7:10 am
    Dogs have a human side. That’s not just their mushy-eyed owners talking, but scientists who study the companionable canines we’ve lived alongside for 30,000 years or more.  Indeed, such is our mental bond with the earliest domesticated animal that researchers are turning to them as models to gain insights into the workings and maladies of the human brain. (See “OCD Dogs, People Have Similar Brains; Is Your Dog OCD?”) Dogs (pictured, a border collie) are great research subjects. Photograph by Vincent J. Musi, National Geographic A scientist whose pioneering work with dogs…
  • Hagfish Slime Could Be Eco-Friendly Fabric

    Guest Blogger
    22 Apr 2014 | 11:41 am
    By Rachel Kaufman Many people are disgusted by the hagfish. These squirmy, eel-looking creatures are known primarily for two repellent traits: eating dying animals from the inside out, and oozing four cups of slime in a fraction of a second. But Douglas Fudge, an integrative biologist at Canada’s University of Guelph, in Ontario, has given us a reason to embrace the goo: It may one day be used to produce a strong, eco-friendly fabric. The recent study by Fudge and colleagues, published April 15 in the Journal of Experimental Biology, has revealed that different hagfish species have…
  • Saving Goat Islands, Jamaica

    International League of Conservation Photographers
    22 Apr 2014 | 10:11 am
    Text and photos by Robin Moore, Fellow at the International League of Conservation Photographers Guardian of the Reptiles “You’ve got to respect another life, so that the other life can respect yours,” says Booms, whose real name is Mr. Kenroy Williams, a young Jamaican who has devoted the past seven years of his life to protecting some of the rarest reptiles in the world, and the largest living land animal in the country; the critically endangered Jamaican iguana. “Some of my friends think I am crazy, when they hear that I am touching the iguanas and the crocodiles. But if they were…
 
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