National Geographic

  • Most Topular Stories

  • Watch: World's Deepest Fish Lurks 5 Miles Down in Mariana Trench

    National Geographic News: Animals
    Jane J. Lee
    19 Dec 2014 | 1:03 pm
    Video footage shows a delicate, transparent animal with a doglike head more than five miles down.
  • World's Most Ambitious Re-Creation of Prehistoric Cave Art to Open

    National Geographic News: Ancient World
    Chip Walter
    19 Dec 2014 | 10:10 am
    With the help of modern artists and high technology, a replica of the famous art cave of Chauvet-Pont-d'Arc will open to the public in April.
  • Rosetta's Comet Lander Will Revive After Bumpy Touchdown, Scientists Say

    National Geographic News: Space and Tech
    Dan Vergano
    17 Dec 2014 | 12:50 pm
    Rosetta mission scientists grow hopeful for a revival of their stranded Philae lander.
  • From the Top

    National Geographic Photo of the Day
    18 Dec 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Sulphur streaks the rocky, lake-filled Ijen crater in East Java, Indonesia. Your Shot member Hendra Gunawan captured this shot after climbing to the crater in the early hours of the morning. “I went to the top,” he says, “and found a beauty I cannot write in words.” Gunawan's picture was recently published in Your Shot's Daily Dozen. This photo was submitted to Your Shot. Check out the new and improved website, where you can share photos, take part in assignments, lend your voice to stories, and connect with fellow photographers from around the globe.
  • Protected No Longer? Desperate Fisheries Managers Want to Open Closed Areas.

    Voices
    Carl Safina
    19 Dec 2014 | 10:22 am
    By Carl Safina and Elizabeth Brown By the early 1990’s, decades of heavy fishing had depleted several of New England’s important fish species, including cod, haddock, pollock and flounders (collectively referred to as ‘groundfish’). Fishermen had been catching fish faster than they could reproduce and had degraded fish habitats by dragging nets. To help rebuild New England’s fish populations, managers established several areas where fishing with any gears capable of catching groundfish species were prohibited. These areas were designed to protect both young, immature fish and large…
 
 
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    National Geographic Photo of the Day

  • From the Top

    18 Dec 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Sulphur streaks the rocky, lake-filled Ijen crater in East Java, Indonesia. Your Shot member Hendra Gunawan captured this shot after climbing to the crater in the early hours of the morning. “I went to the top,” he says, “and found a beauty I cannot write in words.” Gunawan's picture was recently published in Your Shot's Daily Dozen. This photo was submitted to Your Shot. Check out the new and improved website, where you can share photos, take part in assignments, lend your voice to stories, and connect with fellow photographers from around the globe.
  • Salar de Uyuni Sunrise

    17 Dec 2014 | 9:00 pm
    “No wind, no sound—it was a very calm morning,” writes Hideki Mizuta, a member of our Your Shot community who captured this image at Bolivia’s Salar de Uyuni. “I joined a sunrise tour at 2 a.m., first seeing a star-filled sky, and then early in the morning, around 5 a.m., this scene appeared through the window of the car. I ran out in a hurry. It was an amazing view that I couldn’t put into words. I thought, I want this scene all to myself, and walked away from people and took this photo in absolute silence.” Mizuta’s picture recently appeared in Your Shot’s Daily Dozen.
  • Ashura in Bijar

    16 Dec 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Shiite Muslims in Bijar, Iran, mourn during the first ten days of the Islamic month of Muharram, the first month of the lunar-based Islamic calendar. On the tenth day, or Ashura, Shiites commemorate the martyrdom of Hussein, a grandson of Muhammad. امیر بهروزی’s picture was featured in Your Shot’s Daily Dozen. This photo was submitted to Your Shot. Check out the new and improved website, where you can share photos, take part in assignments, lend your voice to stories, and connect with fellow photographers from around the globe.
  • Air Traffic

    Takashi Nakazawa
    15 Dec 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Paragliders stipple the sky above Japan’s Mount Fuji in this picture by Your Shot member Takashi, who writes: “I was shooting from behind the takeoff field so as not to get in the way. I [waited for] the moment when many paragliders gathered in the direction of the mountain—and got this shot.” This photo was submitted to Your Shot. Check out the new and improved website, where you can share photos, take part in assignments, lend your voice to stories, and connect with fellow photographers from around the globe. See our Long Lens feature on Takashi's love affair with Mount Fuji.
  • Horses in the Highlands

    14 Dec 2014 | 9:00 pm
    “A great cloud of dust formed in the distance as we drove through the deserted Icelandic highlands,” writes Your Shot member Charlotte Goss. “We stopped the car and seized our cameras as the herd of Icelandic horses sped toward us. They watched us as we watched them, each of us surprised by the others’ presence. It was over in seconds, yet forever frozen with a single click.” Goss's picture appeared in Your Shot's Daily Dozen. This photo was submitted to Your Shot. Check out the new and improved website, where you can share photos, take part in assignments, lend your voice to…
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    Voices

  • Protected No Longer? Desperate Fisheries Managers Want to Open Closed Areas.

    Carl Safina
    19 Dec 2014 | 10:22 am
    By Carl Safina and Elizabeth Brown By the early 1990’s, decades of heavy fishing had depleted several of New England’s important fish species, including cod, haddock, pollock and flounders (collectively referred to as ‘groundfish’). Fishermen had been catching fish faster than they could reproduce and had degraded fish habitats by dragging nets. To help rebuild New England’s fish populations, managers established several areas where fishing with any gears capable of catching groundfish species were prohibited. These areas were designed to protect both young, immature fish and large…
  • Big Data Arrives on a Small Lake in Vermont

    Lisa Borre
    19 Dec 2014 | 5:00 am
    A blue-green algae bloom on Shelburne Pond in late July. (Photo by Lisa Borre.) While visiting Vermont in late July, I took a day to catch up with colleagues who are studying lakes. University of Vermont (UVM) Rubenstein Ecosystem Science Laboratory director Jason Stockwell arranged for me to go out on a sampling run with two interns. Our destination was Shelburne Pond, a shallow lake located about ten miles south of Burlington. The hyper-eutrophic lake was the subject of my undergraduate thesis research, “Internal Sources of Phosphorus in Shelburne Pond, Vermont.” I was interested to…
  • Next Steps for U.S. Pirate Fishing Rules

    Brian Clark Howard
    18 Dec 2014 | 1:35 pm
    QR Codes on the glass seafood display at the Fish Market at BlackSalt Restaurant in Washington, DC. Photo by Maggie Hines. Do you know if your seafood dinner was caught and imported legally? Chances are good now that you wouldn’t be able to find out. But this week, a special task force of a dozen federal agencies released recommendations on how the U.S. can rein in illegal, or pirate, fishing and make seafood more traceable and sustainable. Carol Browner, a former EPA Administrator who now serves on the Global Ocean Commission, told National Geographic that she is…
  • UN Climate Negotiators Ink Deal in Lima

    Tim Profeta
    18 Dec 2014 | 1:26 pm
    Negotiators have reached a deal at United Nations (UN) talks in Peru, setting the stage for a global climate pact in Paris in December 2015. The agreement, dubbed the Lima Call for Climate Action, for the first time in history commits every nation to reducing its rate of greenhouse gas emissions. “As a text, it’s not perfect but it includes the positions of the parties,” said Peru environment minister and conference chair Manuel Pulgar-Vidal. In addition to an “ambitious agreement” in 2015 that reflects each nation’s “differentiated responsibilities and…
  • Feeding Conservation: An African Vision for Restoring Biodiversity

    Wildlife Conservation Society
    18 Dec 2014 | 9:11 am
    By Dale Lewis Since 2003, the non-profit company Community Markets for Conservation (COMACO) has been working in Zambia to help poor farmers improve their skills, grow surpluses, and receive above-market prices for their produce in exchange for meeting conservation targets. In managing the production and sale of these nutritious and chemical-free products, COMACO has committed itself to passing on above-market-price profits to farmers in the form of raw materials if they commit to conservation. Conservation farming practices taught by COMACO result in farming with nature, not against it,…
 
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    Intelligent Travel

  • Oh, the Places Nat Geo Goes

    Leslie Trew Magraw
    19 Dec 2014 | 1:36 pm
    When you work at National Geographic, one of the first questions people ask is if you get to travel. The answer is often yes, but one of the best parts of the job is being surrounded by sharp, globe-trotting people, and getting to hear their stories. That’s why we asked folks on the Nat Geo Travel team to share a story about the best trip they’ve taken in the past year with our readers. Need inspiration for your next adventure? Look no further: Ethiopia: “Visiting thisplace of dramatic landscapes and Biblical scenes was surreal. What has stayed with me: Green-misted Bale Mountain…
  • Low-Key Caribbean: A Tale of Four Islands

    Henley Vazquez
    18 Dec 2014 | 2:20 pm
    In a world where the easiest route is usually the most popular, it’s no surprise that many vacationers limit their warm-weather winter getaways to the Caribbean’s more accessible islands—especially if they have kids in tow. And while the quick trip has its advantages, some of best destinations require more effort. Add an extra connecting flight to your itinerary to find serene beaches and authentic experiences—without the crowds. Here are four tropical escapes that provide the amenities most valued by travelers—decent accommodations, plenty of restaurants, and reliable…
  • Photo Lesson: Setting the Scene

    Sisse Brimberg and Cotton Coulson
    18 Dec 2014 | 11:27 am
    In addition to being longtime contributing photographers for Traveler magazine, my wife Sisse and I are frequently invited to join National Geographic Expeditions trips as photography experts, interacting with guests aboard the National Geographic Explorer.  On a recent trip to the Macaronesia Islands—composed of the Azores and Madeira (both belonging to Portugal), the Canaries (which is under Spanish rule), and the independent country of Cape Verde—we had 25 passengers sign up for a photo workshop with us. We gave them assignments, or themes, to explore throughout our…
  • Just Back: New York City

    Intelligent Travel
    17 Dec 2014 | 2:30 pm
    National Geographic Traveler features editor Amy Alipio (on Twitter @amytravels and on Instagram @amyalipio) recently returned from a family trip to New York City to soak up the holiday glow. Here are some of the high points of her trip, in her own words: Biggest selling point: Midtown Manhattan absolutely glowed with holiday bling, from the sparkly trees overlooking the skating rink at Rockefeller Center to the dazzling holiday store windows along Fifth Avenue. My favorite display was at Saks where the six animated windows each featured a classic fairy tale transported to a…
  • I Heart My City: Karen’s Bogotá

    I Heart My City
    17 Dec 2014 | 1:15 pm
    Freelance writer Karen Attman moved to Venezuela from the United States nearly two decades ago to embrace the ex-pat life and hasn’t looked back. She moved her home base to Bogotá in 2012 and and thrives on the enthusiasm and creativity of Colombia’s capital city, including that of the Bogotano she now calls her husband. “It’s a flourishing city that has an amazing energy,” she says, “but the main reason is all about the people. They are innovative, creative, loving, open, and generous.” Here are a few of Karen’s favorite things about her adopted…
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    Digital Nomad

  • A Literature Journey of Monterey and Big Sur

    Robert Reid
    29 Nov 2014 | 1:25 pm
    John Steinbeck’s typewriter has left a well-known mark all over this pocket of California, where agriculture meets clear beaches and layered mountains, not to mention one of the world’s great coastal drives. What’s less known is that Steinbeck isn’t the only writer to capture it. For the last leg of this year’s Digital Nomad road trip across the U.S., I’d like to pull out a few books—some less known than others—to illustrate how some pre-reading can transform a visit to one of California’s, and the country’s, most beloved regions. Salinas Valley The obvious entry point…
  • California’s Treasure Island

    Robert Reid
    28 Nov 2014 | 4:07 pm
    “It looks like a zombie apocalypse out here.” More than one local says this of San Francisco’s Treasure Island, an often ignored artificial isle built on dredged sand. And at first sight of the mysterious island, reached halfway across the Bay Bridge, I have to agree. Around me, on wide empty streets, I see paint peeling off rows of glum pre-fab wood buildings with boarded-up windows. The squat gray building rimmed with barbed wire turns out to be an old jail. Most of the 2,000 or so residents here live in weary carport duplexes past a towering pile of landfill. (At least, I see no…
  • California’s Longest-Running Light

    Robert Reid
    27 Nov 2014 | 8:42 am
    It’s got the wine, the hills, the history—and the world’s biggest laser, too. It even has an element named for it (livermorium). What Livermore, California, doesn’t have going for it, perhaps, is its name. Just the mere mention of other wine stars of the Golden State—Napa, Sonoma, Paso Robles—linger on your tongue like a chocolaty, oak-barrel finish. “Livermore” sounds like an unfortunate order in a cafeteria lunch line. The reality, found by the few who take the green exit signs off nearby I-580’s ten lanes, comes quick. “Livermore is where Napa was 20 to 30 years ago,”…
  • A Case for Corvallis, Oregon

    Robert Reid
    24 Nov 2014 | 6:42 am
    “Make yourself at home,” says Carson, a 20-something wearing a purple bandana as a scarf at Troubadour, a music shop in downtown Corvallis. “There’s a bathroom by the banjos.” I’m at an ag school (Oregon State University) a dozen miles off the interstate. There are no museums or monuments of note to see and no historic hotels to settle into. Despite its location where Marys River meets the Willamette, the town of 50,000 has never quite lived up to its name (Latin for “heart of the valley”). Eugene, home to rival Oregon University just south, has the flash (and the…
  • Earning Your Boots in Eastern Oregon

    Robert Reid
    17 Nov 2014 | 7:46 am
    Cows don’t have hangovers, but some have rough mornings. Riding a horse across a valley dotted with junipers doused in a morning drizzle, I see one poking along with two dozen porcupine quills sticking out of its face—leftovers from an overnight tangle with a wrong local. “That’s going to be a chore, getting all those out,” says a cowboy with a black hat, silver moustache and well-worn chaps stretching below a raincoat. “Quills are barbed, like fish hooks. It’ll hurt her.” When I moved to Oregon last year, I bought a road map and started marking it up with things that captured…
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