National Geographic

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  • Why Do Butterflies Have Such Vibrant Colors and Patterns?

    National Geographic News: Animals
    Liz Langley
    7 Mar 2015 | 5:03 am
    Whether shiny gold or iridescent blue, colors help butterflies camouflage and communicate.
  • ISIS Bulldozes One-of-a-Kind Ancient Palace in Iraq

    National Geographic News: Ancient World
    A. R. Williams
    6 Mar 2015 | 11:57 am
    Islamic militants have bulldozed Iraq's only surviving palace from the Assyrian Empire.
  • Caught on Camera

    National Geographic Photo of the Day
    29 Mar 2015 | 9:00 pm
    A camera trap near Yellowstone National Park catches a grizzly bear stealing whitebark pine nuts from a squirrel’s cache. The nuts are an important food for the bears, a threatened species. See more pictures from the April 2015 feature story “The Bug That’s Eating the Woods.” Photographer Drew Rush talks about the story behind the shot on our photography blog, Proof.
  • Balloon mapping False Creek

    (blog) National Geographic
    Ann Chen
    30 Mar 2015 | 3:30 am
    Author flying a weather balloon camera rig in downtown Vancouver. Photo Credit: Stephen Jackson False Creek, a narrow inlet bordering downtown Vancouver, is a site of multiple histories and fluctuating shorelines. Today, the banks of the creek are lined with public art, residential neighborhoods, a science museum, re-zoned sites for real estate development and a network of parks lined with walkways and bike paths. Less than a century ago, the shores were teeming with industrial activity, initially spurred on by the logging industry. Before that, for thousands of years, First Nations people…
  • Seven Perfect Days in Belize

    Intelligent Travel
    Costas Christ
    27 Mar 2015 | 11:50 am
    I have been traveling to Belize every year for more than a decade and am already planning my next trip. Why? As the only English-speaking country in Central America, as well as one of its smallest (it’s about the size of New Jersey), Belize is surprisingly easy to navigate. Local residents are fun-loving, friendly, and appreciate nature; nearly half of the country is protected rain forest, including Cockscomb Basin Wildlife Reserve, the world’s first wilderness sanctuary for jaguars. Just offshore lies the largest barrier reef in the northern hemisphere, teeming with marine life and…
 
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    National Geographic Photo of the Day

  • Caught on Camera

    29 Mar 2015 | 9:00 pm
    A camera trap near Yellowstone National Park catches a grizzly bear stealing whitebark pine nuts from a squirrel’s cache. The nuts are an important food for the bears, a threatened species. See more pictures from the April 2015 feature story “The Bug That’s Eating the Woods.” Photographer Drew Rush talks about the story behind the shot on our photography blog, Proof.
  • All the Fish in the Sea

    28 Mar 2015 | 9:00 pm
    Your Shot member Jeff Hester was drawn to make this image because, he says, “I believe this is what our oceans should look like.” But Cabo Pulmo, a marine park off Mexico’s Baja California peninsula, hasn't always been this way. “In 1995, [the] park was established by local citizens to counteract depleted reef fishes and marine life due to overfishing,” he says. “Today, the biomass is booming, and the ecosystem is returning to a healthy state. For this particular image, I wanted to show some scale ... so I had my wife, seen in the foreground, swim ahead of me.” This photo was…
  • Top of the Ladder

    27 Mar 2015 | 9:00 pm
    Cincinnati Fire Department recruits participate in a morning drill. The assignment? Climb to the top of a hundred-foot aerial ladder. Your Shot member Adam Schierberg, also a firefighter, positioned himself at the top of a drill tower to get this shot. “My intention was to capture the intensity of the climb by taking a vertical approach that also captured [the] anxiously awaiting candidates,” he writes. This photo was submitted to Your Shot, our storytelling community where members can take part in photo assignments, get expert feedback, be published, and more. Join now>>
  • Deer Hide

    26 Mar 2015 | 9:00 pm
    “This situation happened to come to fruition due to my five-year-old's love of the outdoors,” says Your Shot member Jeremy Baker, who captured this shot in Minot, North Dakota. Baker’s son had asked to go for a drive to look for wildlife to photograph. “[While] driving down a secluded dirt road ... I noticed a doe moving through the dried up sunflowers, trying to hide from me. I turned off my truck and used the window as a tripod and snapped away, as she was curious enough to show me her vulnerable side.” This photo was submitted to Your Shot, our storytelling community where…
  • Grueling Coursework

    25 Mar 2015 | 9:00 pm
    Policemen in the Indian state of Chhattisgarh are put through a grueling commando course at the Counter Terrorism and Jungle Warfare College, in Kanker. In India’s mineral-rich jungles, Maoist militants called Naxalites have found a foothold through violence and extortion. Chhattisgarh is among two states with the worst record of Naxalite violence. See more pictures from the April 2015 feature story “How Coal Fuels India’s Insurgency.” Lynsey Addario talks about going beyond her comfort zone to make powerful images, on Proof.
 
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    (blog) National Geographic

  • Balloon mapping False Creek

    Ann Chen
    30 Mar 2015 | 3:30 am
    Author flying a weather balloon camera rig in downtown Vancouver. Photo Credit: Stephen Jackson False Creek, a narrow inlet bordering downtown Vancouver, is a site of multiple histories and fluctuating shorelines. Today, the banks of the creek are lined with public art, residential neighborhoods, a science museum, re-zoned sites for real estate development and a network of parks lined with walkways and bike paths. Less than a century ago, the shores were teeming with industrial activity, initially spurred on by the logging industry. Before that, for thousands of years, First Nations people…
  • Message in a Belizean bottle: think global, act local and step up plastics recycling

    Justin Catanoso
    30 Mar 2015 | 3:30 am
    Long Caye, a Caribbean island 47 miles off the coast of Belize, is awash in plastic. Here, students of Wake Forest University’s coral ecology class size up the never-ending problem. Photo by Justin Catanoso Who left their trash behind on this remote Caribbean island? Then I realized. It wasn’t left. It arrived. An endless flotilla of refuse heedlessly sent from afar. It’s heartbreaking. The image of a lone bottle washing up on a remote tropical island is the clichéd stuff of literature, movies and New Yorker cartoons. But what about the image of thousands of bottles, millions…
  • Looking for Life

    Daniel Koehler
    28 Mar 2015 | 11:45 am
    At the beginning of March, I returned to New Xade for an extended visit. Someone in the community had recently passed away, and the funeral was scheduled for the same weekend I arrived. The day before the ceremony, I went to the cemetery to help dig the grave. A dozen of us took a couple of shovels and picks and, after marking the appropriate spot, started digging, rotating out when our arms or backs wearied. We started at two in the afternoon and finished just before sundown. The grave was two and a half meters deep, well above my head. Unfortunately, at some point in the process, I threw…
  • Ancestors’ Knowledge Helps Keep These Kids ‘Strong’

    Miguel Vilar
    27 Mar 2015 | 2:49 pm
    By Anika Rice, Explorer Programs Northeastern Madagascar’s incredibly diverse forests are home to rich local medicinal traditions. The Makira forest area in particular houses some 250 plant species that are used to treat more than 80 illnesses. Some experts estimate that the Makira watershed houses 50 percent of Malagasy floral biodiversity. Locals harvest and prepare these plants to treat everything from everyday fatigue and headaches to more serious ailments like malaria. The Makira Natural Park is home to the Betsimisaraka and Tsimihety ethnolinguistic groups, communities that were…
  • C40 Latin American Mayors Forum Showcases Region’s Bold Climate Leadership

    C40 News Team
    27 Mar 2015 | 9:20 am
    Today C40 held its first-ever Latin American Mayors Forum, hosted by Buenos Aires Mayor Mauricio Macri and attended by more than 15 mayors and vice-mayors from the region. During the Forum, it was announced that 20 Latin American mayors have joined the Compact of Mayors, and 20 global C40 cities have committed to pursuing clean buses. These two major declarations signify the bold actions cities around the world are taking in the global fight against change. Mayor Macri, Mexico City Mayor Miguel Ángel Mancera and former President of Mexico and Chair of the Global Commission on the Economy…
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    Intelligent Travel

  • Seven Perfect Days in Belize

    Costas Christ
    27 Mar 2015 | 11:50 am
    I have been traveling to Belize every year for more than a decade and am already planning my next trip. Why? As the only English-speaking country in Central America, as well as one of its smallest (it’s about the size of New Jersey), Belize is surprisingly easy to navigate. Local residents are fun-loving, friendly, and appreciate nature; nearly half of the country is protected rain forest, including Cockscomb Basin Wildlife Reserve, the world’s first wilderness sanctuary for jaguars. Just offshore lies the largest barrier reef in the northern hemisphere, teeming with marine life and…
  • Instagram of the Month: Mount Cook

    Tyler Metcalfe
    27 Mar 2015 | 10:46 am
    A photo posted by ! Johan Lolos World Explorer (@lebackpacker) on Mar 22, 2015 at 10:31pm PDT Johan Lolos (on Instagram @LeBackpacker) has been roaming the globe with a pack on his back and a camera at the ready since 2013. He’s currently making his way across New Zealand, and sharing photographs from his escapades on Instagram. Here’s a peek into how he got this winning shot of a hiker in Mount Cook National Park: Tyler Metcalfe: You’re from Belgium. What were you doing in New Zealand in the first place?  Johan Lolos: I’m in the midst of traveling around the world.
  • The Postcard Project

    Amy Alipio
    26 Mar 2015 | 1:03 pm
    “Are postcards obsolete?” asked a recent article in the Washington Post Travel section. Well, it depends on who’s answering. I’ve been collecting postcards since I was a little kid—keepsakes from my own travels as well as postcards friends and relatives have sent me. In fact, they’re the only thing I collect—aside from half-used hotel toiletries—when I’m on the road. That makes me, I found out, a deltiologist. I file the postcards more or less alphabetically by state and country in a sturdy green plastic carrying case that used to hold collectible wildlife cards…
  • Why Conservation Tourism Matters

    Katie Knorovsky
    26 Mar 2015 | 10:54 am
    First, they fell in love with each other—then with the fauna of Africa. National Geographic explorers-in-residence Dereck and Beverly Joubert have spent the past three decades captivating audiences with their rare footage and photographs of big cats. Now, they’re taking aim at a different kind of challenge: conservation tourism. By occupying land that might otherwise be poaching grounds, the husband-and-wife team’s Great Plains Conservation safari camps in Botswana and Kenya give lions, leopards, elephants, and other wildlife a chance at survival. At least for now. Here’s a look…
  • I Heart My City: Lynda’s Dubai

    I Heart My City
    25 Mar 2015 | 2:53 pm
    Back in 2010, Houston-born schoolteacher Lynda Martinez traded the Gulf of Mexico for the Persian Gulf—with two sons in tow—when her husband was offered a job in Dubai. Though her “heart is still in Texas,” Lynda has grown fond of her current home base and shares the love on her blog, Longhorns and Camels. What does Lynda like best about living in one of the most diverse cities on Earth? Being able to “build friendships with people from all over the world, sample cuisine from far-flung places, and learn about a variety of customs.”  Here’s a look…
 
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