National Geographic

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  • The Best Seat in Yosemite

    National Geographic Photo of the Day
    Christian Adam
    30 Jun 2015 | 9:00 pm
    Under a blanket of stars, a man takes in the landscape of Yosemite National Park from the edge of the Diving Board, a rock formation at Glacier Point. Fernandez’s image was recently featured in Your Shot’s Daily Dozen.
  • Fulbright-National Geographic Digital Storytelling Fellowship Awards Announced

    Voices
    David Maxwell Braun
    1 Jul 2015 | 1:19 pm
    Five Fellows from across the United States will receive grants as part of the 2015-2016 Fulbright-National Geographic Digital Storytelling Fellowship to travel overseas and use multi-media storytelling techniques to build awareness of transnational challenges, the U.S. Department of State and the National Geographic Society announced yesterday. The Fellows were selected by the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board following an academic review and recommendations by an editorial panel of National Geographic staff. Over a nine-month period, the Fellows will share their stories on a…
  • I Heart My City: Peggy’s Virginia Beach

    Intelligent Travel
    I Heart My City
    1 Jul 2015 | 2:38 pm
    Virginia Beach native Peggy Sijswerda can remember when her hometown was a sleepy little city covered in cornfields. Today, acting as editor and publisher ofregional magazines Tidewater Women and Tidewater Family keeps Peggy more than busy, but she still makes time to enjoy all this coastal gem has to offer—”amazing history, beaches, boating, swimming, and seriously tasty seafood” chief among them. Here are a few of her favorite things about the city she’s proud to call home. Virginia Beach Is My City When someone comes to visit me, the first place I take them is…
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    National Geographic Photo of the Day

  • The Best Seat in Yosemite

    Christian Adam
    30 Jun 2015 | 9:00 pm
    Under a blanket of stars, a man takes in the landscape of Yosemite National Park from the edge of the Diving Board, a rock formation at Glacier Point. Fernandez’s image was recently featured in Your Shot’s Daily Dozen.
  • Getting Their Shot

    29 Jun 2015 | 9:00 pm
    “The Oslo Opera House is a very special place,” writes Wim Uyttenbroeck, who captured this picture in the Norwegian capital. “These three colorful photographers make a nice contrast against the white stone and plate glass of the building. The white clouds in the sky make the picture complete.” This photo was submitted to the 2015 Traveler Photo Contest.
  • Put a Wing on It

    28 Jun 2015 | 9:00 pm
    In this picture by Mohd Khorshid, a willow warbler splashes in a pool of water in Al Ahmadi, Kuwait. Willow warblers pass through the country in large numbers during their long seasonal migrations. This photo was submitted to the 2015 Traveler Photo Contest. Find your best travel photos and join the competition.
  • Peak of Dawn

    27 Jun 2015 | 9:00 pm
    Shirley poppies bloom in a field near Japan’s Mount Tsukuba, here silhouetted against an early morning sky. The mountain—which can be ascended via a hiking trail or cable car—has two peaks, each rising more than 2,800 feet. This photo was submitted to the 2015 Traveler Photo Contest. Find your best travel photos and join the competition.
  • Tree Top

    26 Jun 2015 | 9:00 pm
    A lone tree grows on a pillar of quartz and sandstone in China’s Zhangjiajie National Forest Park. There are more than 3,000 such peaks in the Hunan Province park, part of a UNESCO World Heritage site. Its diverse landscape—dense forest, gullies, cliffs, and valleys—shelter macaque and rhesus monkeys, pangolins, and Chinese giant salamanders, as well as rare birds and trees. This photo was submitted to the 2015 Traveler Photo Contest. Find your best travel photos and join the competition.
 
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    Voices

  • Fulbright-National Geographic Digital Storytelling Fellowship Awards Announced

    David Maxwell Braun
    1 Jul 2015 | 1:19 pm
    Five Fellows from across the United States will receive grants as part of the 2015-2016 Fulbright-National Geographic Digital Storytelling Fellowship to travel overseas and use multi-media storytelling techniques to build awareness of transnational challenges, the U.S. Department of State and the National Geographic Society announced yesterday. The Fellows were selected by the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board following an academic review and recommendations by an editorial panel of National Geographic staff. Over a nine-month period, the Fellows will share their stories on a…
  • Large, Strange Fish at the “Last Wild Island”

    Mikayla Wujec & Andrea Reid
    1 Jul 2015 | 1:08 pm
    We have just returned from our third and final study site in our ongoing search for bumphead parrotfish (Bolbometopon muricatum) in the Solomon Islands. At 46 square miles (120 square kilometers) and with zero permanent inhabitants, our last site, Tetepare, is the largest uninhabited island in the South Pacific (read our earlier posts). Commonly known as the “last wild island,” Tetepare has been largely uninhabited since the mid 1800s, save for a few failed attempts at establishing industry and settlements. This leaves the waters surrounding the island and its forests nearly…
  • New Research from C40 and Arup Shows How City Governments are Changing the World

    C40 News Team
    1 Jul 2015 | 8:30 am
    Today, C40 and Arup released Powering Climate Action: Cities as Global Changemakers, a report that demonstrates cities are taking substantial steps on climate action by collaborating and leveraging partnerships not only with each other, but also with the private sector and civil society. Seth Schultz, C40 Director of Research, Measurement & Planning, said: “The Powering Climate Action report offers empirical confirmation of what we at C40 have witnessed over the past decade. Mayors face similar challenges and seek to implement similar solutions, and this provides a basis for the…
  • What the River Knows: Virgin River, Utah

    Basia Irland
    30 Jun 2015 | 9:01 pm
    In this series, “What the River Knows,” by Basia Irland, the artist and water activist writes from the perspective of each river, using the first person. Installments are published in Water Currents every other week on Mondays. The first post is about the Ping River in Chiang Mai, Thailand. Other posts include the Chao Phraya River, Bangkok; Kamo-gawa River, Kyoto; Siem Reap River, Cambodia; Yaqui River, Mexico, where the eight Yaqui tribal villages do not have water due to agricultural corporations; the superfund site on the Eagle River in Colorado, polluted with heavy metal runoff…
  • Africa’s Vultures Are Collapsing to Extinction

    Darcy Ogada
    30 Jun 2015 | 2:21 pm
    Among members of the public, I describe myself as a conservationist, or more typically my response is, “I study birds.” Among my conservation colleagues, I have to go a step further—”I study vultures”—to which the near-unanimous reply is “I just don’t see vultures anymore.” Sigh … Lappet-faced, white-backed, and Cape vultures squabble over a carcass at Sable Dam, Kruger National Park, South Africa. Our study suggests that these three species are declining at a rate of 80–92 percent over three generations (about 45–55 years). (Photo by Andre…
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    Intelligent Travel

  • I Heart My City: Peggy’s Virginia Beach

    I Heart My City
    1 Jul 2015 | 2:38 pm
    Virginia Beach native Peggy Sijswerda can remember when her hometown was a sleepy little city covered in cornfields. Today, acting as editor and publisher ofregional magazines Tidewater Women and Tidewater Family keeps Peggy more than busy, but she still makes time to enjoy all this coastal gem has to offer—”amazing history, beaches, boating, swimming, and seriously tasty seafood” chief among them. Here are a few of her favorite things about the city she’s proud to call home. Virginia Beach Is My City When someone comes to visit me, the first place I take them is…
  • Video: The Best of Quebec City

    Annie Fitzsimmons
    1 Jul 2015 | 11:55 am
    After spending a week on assignment in Quebec City, I thought I’d make a list of some of my favorite finds. (Let me know if you have others to add by leaving a comment below, because this is one city I’ll definitely be returning to soon.) And, while I was able to spend a full seven days in Quebec’s loveliest city (sorry, Montreal!), I realize not everyone is blessed with that much time to explore. That’s why I put together a video itinerary of the “Perfect Day in Quebec City.” Best Grand Hotel: Is there any question? The recently refurbished Fairmont…
  • The Movie Geek’s Guide to Wellington

    Intelligent Travel
    30 Jun 2015 | 1:02 pm
    Movie buffs can explore countless shooting locations on New Zealand’s North Island, whose landscapes hold cinematic cachet. The Piano (1993), by native daughter Jane Campion, starred Karekare, a black-sand surf beach in Auckland’s Waitakere Ranges. Fellow Kiwi Andrew Adamson transformed nearby Woodhill Forest into a witch’s camp in Narnia in The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (2005). Hollywood tapped volcanic Mount Taranaki, on the west coast, to play Japan’s Mount Fuji in The Last Samurai (2003). But when time is limited, Wellington and its environs provide ample…
  • In Praise of the Imperfect Photograph

    Heather Greenwood Davis
    30 Jun 2015 | 11:36 am
    My father, 69, is going through his massive collection of slides and digitizing them. As a result, every few days a photo or two from a family beach outing or a holiday long past will pop into my email stream without warning. They aren’t particularly arresting images—no wild kaleidoscopic sunsets or Instagram-worthy food shots here—and yet they command my immediate attention. In one (seen at right) I’m looking at the camera as my mother, slightly cut off, is braiding my hair. My younger brother, then about two, is reaching for the photographer. The color is too bright in some…
  • Just Back: Santiago, Chile

    Intelligent Travel
    30 Jun 2015 | 10:19 am
    National Geographic Traveler associate editor Susan O’Keefe (on Twitter @sokeefetrav and Instagram @susanokeefe) always thought of Santiago, Chile, as a prelude to skiing in the Andes or hiking through Patagonia. But on a recent trip she was taken in by the city’s grand colonial architecture, wide boulevards, and charming neighborhoods. Here are some of the high points of Susan’s trip, in her own words: Memorable moment: Santiago has a growing sharing-economy scene and one of my favorite lunches was in the private cocina of Maria Eugenia Terragno, a former executive chef…
 
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