National Geographic

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  • Peeking Kirkjufell

    National Geographic Photo of the Day
    DEANZ
    30 Aug 2015 | 9:00 pm
    Located on the coast of the Snaefellsnes Peninsula in western Iceland, Kirkjufell, which means “church mountain,” is said to be the most photographed mountain in the country. It’s a challenging climb to the top—but worth the extraordinary view when you get there. This photo was submitted to Your Shot, our storytelling community where members can take part in photo assignments, get expert feedback, be published, and more. Join now »
  • Final Post: Wrapping up, and Presenting Pathways

    National Geographic (blogs)
    Mimi Onuoha
    31 Aug 2015 | 4:52 am
    To skip the explanation below and visit the site directly, go here. On September 7th, 2014, I boarded a plane from New York City to London to officially begin my stint as a National Geographic Fulbright Digital Storytelling Fellow. Today, close to a year later, I’ve finally launched the output of this year of work, research, and investigation. That result is Pathways, a website that presents an exploration of a month’s worth of mobile data from four different groups of Londoners. I came to London interested in what our data can tell us about our lives, as experienced online and offline. I…
  • Chicago’s Polish Triangle

    Intelligent Travel
    Intelligent Travel
    28 Aug 2015 | 2:08 pm
    Next to Warsaw, Chicago has the world’s second largest Polish population. The Polonia Triangle, center of the city’s original Polish Downtown, is the Illinois city’s oldest, most prominent Polish settlement, full of local Polish shops and restaurants. Though the years have taken their toll, the area has recently undergone a renaissance and is once again becoming a thriving business district, full of nightclubs, restaurants, and cafes. > Where to Go: What Podhalanka, a hole-in-the-wall former tavern, lacks in atmosphere, it makes up for in Polish comfort food. Krakow-born…
  • The Rising Stars of Kenya’s Greater Mara

    Digital Nomad
    Robert Reid
    27 Aug 2015 | 12:04 pm
    Dusk is done and I see nothing. But, even after a long hot day tracking wildlife in the bush, my guide refuses to quit. He edges the Land Cruiser we’re sharing forward, headlights off, and makes a a blind, wide arc to the left. After he parks and cuts the engine, we wait in the dark, listening to a light breeze riffle the nearby brush. Several lonely minutes later, a thunder of hooves erupts, and a couple dozen topi rush toward us. A lovely reddish-brown and purple by day, the horned antelopes are mere shadowy outlines now. They weave around us like X-wing Starfighters, then vanish…
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    National Geographic Photo of the Day

  • Peeking Kirkjufell

    DEANZ
    30 Aug 2015 | 9:00 pm
    Located on the coast of the Snaefellsnes Peninsula in western Iceland, Kirkjufell, which means “church mountain,” is said to be the most photographed mountain in the country. It’s a challenging climb to the top—but worth the extraordinary view when you get there. This photo was submitted to Your Shot, our storytelling community where members can take part in photo assignments, get expert feedback, be published, and more. Join now »
  • Tide Is High

    29 Aug 2015 | 9:00 pm
    “Pay attention,” Your Shot member Fran Virues Avila was told by the diver seen here. “My jump will be worthy of observing.” Avila visits La Caleta Beach in Cádiz, Spain, every year to see people take the plunge when the tide is high. Perhaps this particular diver trains during the year or has natural athletic abilities, Avila ponders. In any case, he writes, the result did not disappoint, displaying “a mixture [of] freedom and courage.” This photo was submitted to Your Shot, our storytelling community where members can take part in photo assignments, get expert feedback, be…
  • Painted Pink

    28 Aug 2015 | 9:00 pm
    Sunset surrounds the late 19th-century Rattray Head lighthouse in Aberdeenshire, Scotland. Your Shot member Grant Glendinning captured the dusk’s changing light with a long exposure and a neutral density and polarizing filter attached to a wide-angle lens. Glendinning’s image was recently featured in Your Shot’s Daily Dozen.
  • Skin and Bones

    27 Aug 2015 | 9:00 pm
    Having succumbed to the forces of man or nature, an Arabian oryx leaves behind its skull and well-weathered horns. The “fascinating” remains were captured by Your Shot member Mario Cardenas in Al Gharbia, a region in the western United Arab Emirates. The camel and riders head in the direction of the annual camel festival in Madinat Zayed. This photo was submitted to Your Shot, our storytelling community where members can take part in photo assignments, get expert feedback, be published, and more. Join now »
  • Rising Up

    Copyright Paul Reiffer 2015 - All Rights reserved - PaulReiffer.com
    26 Aug 2015 | 9:00 pm
    The famed water-bound willows of Glenorchy, New Zealand, rise from Lake Wakatipu on the country’s South Island. Your Shot member Paul Reiffer, who photographed the scene at sunrise, calls winter “a special time in New Zealand.” Reiffer’s image was recently featured in Your Shot’s Daily Dozen. This photo was submitted to Your Shot, our storytelling community where members can take part in photo assignments, get expert feedback, be published, and more. Join now »
 
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    National Geographic (blogs)

  • Final Post: Wrapping up, and Presenting Pathways

    Mimi Onuoha
    31 Aug 2015 | 4:52 am
    To skip the explanation below and visit the site directly, go here. On September 7th, 2014, I boarded a plane from New York City to London to officially begin my stint as a National Geographic Fulbright Digital Storytelling Fellow. Today, close to a year later, I’ve finally launched the output of this year of work, research, and investigation. That result is Pathways, a website that presents an exploration of a month’s worth of mobile data from four different groups of Londoners. I came to London interested in what our data can tell us about our lives, as experienced online and offline. I…
  • Video: The Accepting Nature of Orphaned Baby Elephants

    David Maxwell Braun
    30 Aug 2015 | 6:00 pm
    Investigative journalist Bryan Christy set out on a groundbreaking mission to expose how the ivory trade funds some of Africa’s most notorious militias and terrorist groups. Working with one of the world’s top taxidermists, he concealed a sophisticated GPS tracker inside an incredibly realistic faux ivory tusk and dropped it in the heart of ivory poaching country and monitored its movements to track down the kingpins of the ivory trade. In this outtake from the National Geographic Explorer show “Warlords of Ivory,” Bryan Christy visits the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust…
  • How Paper Cranes Became a Symbol of Healing in Japan

    Ari Beser
    28 Aug 2015 | 7:23 am
    Every day school children visit the monument for the child victims of Hiroshima adorned with a statue of Sadako Sasaki holding up an origami crane. The museum receives millions of paper cranes from around the world. Photograph By Ari Beser.    Hiroshima, JAPAN—Origami, the Japanese art of folding paper, often conjures images of paper cranes, or orizuru in Japanese. I began to wonder, where does this fabled art form originate, and why are paper cranes regarded as a symbol of peace? After some digging, I discovered that paper folding was reserved for ceremonies around the 6th century…
  • Adirondacks Continue to Amaze Riders with Sunny Days and Beautiful Vistas

    Wildlife Conservation Society
    27 Aug 2015 | 2:46 pm
    [Note: This is the second of three blogs about Cycle Adirondacks, which runs from August 23-29. ] For the past few days, Cycle Adirondacks participants have seen beautiful biking habitats, rolling hills, green-hued farm fields, and quiet back roads of the Tug Hill Plateau, just west of the Adirondacks. As we rode into Camden, N.Y., I even saw a tree full of birdhouses and a bird motel. On the first day of Cycle Adirondacks, riders traveled from Saranac Lake to Star Lake, N.Y. Photo Credit: Left Eye Images. Our merry band on the Riders for the Wild team enjoyed all the special touches on this…
  • Images From North America’s Highest Peak

    Gregg Treinish
    27 Aug 2015 | 7:45 am
      Peter & Hollie descend the crest of the West Buttress by the light of the “midnight” sun at 1am, having broken camp at 17,200. (Photo by David Leonard) Ian Bolliger, Peter McCarthy and Dave and Hollie Leonard flew into Kahilta Base camp this spring aiming to summit Denali and ski either the Orient Express or Messner Couloir. Three of them summited the 20,237-foot peak, the highest in North American, and together, the team managed to gather snow samples from 17,000 feet for the Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation Snow & Ice Collections research on high altitude…
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    Intelligent Travel

  • Chicago’s Polish Triangle

    Intelligent Travel
    28 Aug 2015 | 2:08 pm
    Next to Warsaw, Chicago has the world’s second largest Polish population. The Polonia Triangle, center of the city’s original Polish Downtown, is the Illinois city’s oldest, most prominent Polish settlement, full of local Polish shops and restaurants. Though the years have taken their toll, the area has recently undergone a renaissance and is once again becoming a thriving business district, full of nightclubs, restaurants, and cafes. > Where to Go: What Podhalanka, a hole-in-the-wall former tavern, lacks in atmosphere, it makes up for in Polish comfort food. Krakow-born…
  • I Heart My City: Janet’s Groningen

    I Heart My City
    26 Aug 2015 | 2:58 pm
    After years spent exploring the world, Irish travel blogger Janet Newenham found herself enrolling in a Master’s program at the University of Groningen in the northern Netherlands, and quickly fell in love with the place. Though the peripatetic journalist has spent time in nearly 50 countries so far, and recently returned to the Emerald Isle to work in Dublin, Groningen will always occupy a special place in her heart. “It’s often overlooked, thanks to fierce competition from Amsterdam and Utrecht, but Groningen is one of the most friendly, fun, and easy-going cities in…
  • I Heart My European Hometown: #PostcardProject

    Leslie Trew Magraw
    25 Aug 2015 | 1:43 pm
    National Geographic Traveler features editor Amy Alipio recently asked our readers to weigh in on whether they thought the postcard was obsolete. The response was astounding. Seems the postcard isn’t the dying art (and travel tradition) we feared it was. In the past several months (and with a little help from the Postcrossing.com community), hundreds of rectangle-shaped missives—from Shanghai to Sheboygan—have flooded into Nat Geo headquarters to put a point on that fact. Some of the postcards are handmade, featuring original photography, sketches, or collage work. Others were…
  • A Guide to Kid-Friendly Tokyo

    Heather Greenwood Davis
    25 Aug 2015 | 7:12 am
    National Geographic Traveler columnist Heather Greenwood Davis is the magazine’s family travel advocate, guru, and soothsayer. Here’s her latest advice: Reader Question: I’m taking my middle-school-age daughter to Tokyo. Is it kid-friendly? Heather’s Response: “Japan’s capital city offers traditional culture, yet it’s hip [enough] in terms of pop culture and technology to keep children engaged,” says Akane Tanaka, chief concierge at the Peninsula Hotel in Tokyo. Limit activities to one special-interest spot per day like Sanrio Puroland (the Hello Kitty theme park) or…
  • Adventure 101: Rafting the Grand Canyon

    Intelligent Travel
    24 Aug 2015 | 11:00 am
    Flowing 1,450 miles through the American West and northwest Mexico before ending at the Gulf of California, the Colorado River is the Southwest’s principal waterway. Its most scenic stretch cuts through—and helped shape—the Grand Canyon. > Running the River: Numerous outfitters guide float trips through Grand Canyon National Park. National Geographic Traveler writer and photographer Pete McBride went with O.A.R.S., one of the first outfitters granted a license to operate trips on this stretch of the river. Other concessionaires include Arizona River Runners, Grand Canyon…
 
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    Digital Nomad

  • The Rising Stars of Kenya’s Greater Mara

    Robert Reid
    27 Aug 2015 | 12:04 pm
    Dusk is done and I see nothing. But, even after a long hot day tracking wildlife in the bush, my guide refuses to quit. He edges the Land Cruiser we’re sharing forward, headlights off, and makes a a blind, wide arc to the left. After he parks and cuts the engine, we wait in the dark, listening to a light breeze riffle the nearby brush. Several lonely minutes later, a thunder of hooves erupts, and a couple dozen topi rush toward us. A lovely reddish-brown and purple by day, the horned antelopes are mere shadowy outlines now. They weave around us like X-wing Starfighters, then vanish…
  • One True Thing About Kenya

    Robert Reid
    20 Aug 2015 | 8:20 am
    “In your text, treat Africa as if it were one country.” That’s tongue-in-cheek advice from Kenyan writer Binyavanga Wainaina’s brilliant satirical essay “How to Write About Africa.” I came across it because I’ll be traveling around Kenya as National Geographic Travel’s Digital Nomad for the next month, and, if I’m being honest, I’m not yet sure how to write—as Ernest Hemingway might put it—“one true sentence” about the country. This is my first time to Kenya, which, incidentally, happens to be the first African nation I knew by name. When I was a kid,…
  • A Literature Journey of Monterey and Big Sur

    Robert Reid
    29 Nov 2014 | 1:25 pm
    John Steinbeck’s typewriter has left a well-known mark all over this pocket of California, where agriculture meets clear beaches and layered mountains, not to mention one of the world’s great coastal drives. What’s less known is that Steinbeck isn’t the only writer to capture it. For the last leg of this year’s Digital Nomad road trip across the U.S., I’d like to pull out a few books—some less known than others—to illustrate how some pre-reading can transform a visit to one of California’s, and the country’s, most beloved regions. Salinas Valley The obvious entry point…
  • California’s Treasure Island

    Robert Reid
    28 Nov 2014 | 4:07 pm
    “It looks like a zombie apocalypse out here.” More than one local says this of San Francisco’s Treasure Island, an often ignored artificial isle built on dredged sand. And at first sight of the mysterious island, reached halfway across the Bay Bridge, I have to agree. Around me, on wide empty streets, I see paint peeling off rows of glum pre-fab wood buildings with boarded-up windows. The squat gray building rimmed with barbed wire turns out to be an old jail. Most of the 2,000 or so residents here live in weary carport duplexes past a towering pile of landfill. (At least, I see no…
  • California’s Longest-Running Light

    Robert Reid
    27 Nov 2014 | 8:42 am
    It’s got the wine, the hills, the history—and the world’s biggest laser, too. It even has an element named for it (livermorium). What Livermore, California, doesn’t have going for it, perhaps, is its name. Just the mere mention of other wine stars of the Golden State—Napa, Sonoma, Paso Robles—linger on your tongue like a chocolaty, oak-barrel finish. “Livermore” sounds like an unfortunate order in a cafeteria lunch line. The reality, found by the few who take the green exit signs off nearby I-580’s ten lanes, comes quick. “Livermore is where Napa was 20 to 30 years ago,”…
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