National Geographic

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  • Social Octopus Species Shatters Beliefs About Ocean Dwellers

    National Geographic News: Animals
    Katherine Harmon Courage
    28 Jul 2014 | 12:55 pm
    The discovery of an octopus that lives in big groups is shattering even the most expansive ideas of known octopus behavior.
  • Asteroid Timing Erased the Dinosaurs?

    National Geographic News: Ancient World
    Dan Vergano
    28 Jul 2014 | 4:57 am
    Amid volcanoes and climate zig-zags, an asteroid impact bumped off dinosaurs at a weak moment for the giant beasts.
  • Spotted

    National Geographic Photo of the Day
    28 Jul 2014 | 9:00 pm
    A leopard gingerly crosses the branch of an acacia tree in Tarangire National Park, Tanzania. “We were almost back to camp when someone in our party spotted this solitary leopard from well over a hundred meters,” writes Your Shot member Logan Watts. “As we slowly approached, it seemed relaxed and began to move up a branch in profile. The dappled foliage and powerful limbs of the acacia paired with the spotted muscular pose of the cat seemed fitting for black and white.” This photo was submitted to Your Shot. Check out the new and improved website, where you can share photos, take part…
  • 101 Geysers Spotted Erupting From Saturn Moon

    News Watch
    Dan Vergano
    28 Jul 2014 | 3:28 pm
      Dramatic plumes, both large and small, spray water ice and vapor from many locations along the famed “tiger stripes” near the south pole of Saturn’s moon Enceladus. Courtesy NASA/JPL Erupting from fractures, 101 geysers dot the surface of Saturn’s frozen moon, Enceladus, report NASA scientists. First spotted as plumes in 2005, the total number of geysers has been revealed by a long series of overflights by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft. The geysers are “not a near-surface phenomenon but have much deeper roots,”  says Cassini imaging team  leader…
  • Pay Less to Phone Home

    Intelligent Travel
    Christopher Elliott
    28 Jul 2014 | 8:35 am
    National Geographic Traveler Editor at Large Christopher Elliott is the magazine’s consumer advocate and ombudsman. Over the past 15 years he has helped countless readers fix their trips. Here’s his latest advice: Reader Question: I’m an American taking a two-week trip to Norway. How do I inexpensively call family back home? My Answer: Don’t purchase a pricey international plan from your wireless carrier. For example, AT&T’s least expensive rate costs an extra $30 per month and charges $1 a minute for your calls in Scandinavia. Instead, when you get to your destination,…
 
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    National Geographic Photo of the Day

  • Spotted

    28 Jul 2014 | 9:00 pm
    A leopard gingerly crosses the branch of an acacia tree in Tarangire National Park, Tanzania. “We were almost back to camp when someone in our party spotted this solitary leopard from well over a hundred meters,” writes Your Shot member Logan Watts. “As we slowly approached, it seemed relaxed and began to move up a branch in profile. The dappled foliage and powerful limbs of the acacia paired with the spotted muscular pose of the cat seemed fitting for black and white.” This photo was submitted to Your Shot. Check out the new and improved website, where you can share photos, take part…
  • Standing Guard

    Jim Richardson
    27 Jul 2014 | 9:00 pm
    The Stones of Stenness may be Britain’s most ancient stone circle. Erected during the Stone Age on the Orkney Islands at the northern tip of modern-day Scotland, the stones likely formed part of a larger complex linked by religious ritual. See more pictures from the August 2014 feature story “Before Stonehenge."
  • Gold Dust

    26 Jul 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Pollen dusts the petals of a flower in Galway, Ireland, in this close-up by Your Shot member Kinga Sztok. “What I love about macro photography is that it reveals the amazing details that are not visible to the naked eye, or things we're too busy to notice each day,” writes Sztok. This photo was submitted to Your Shot. Check out the new and improved website, where you can share photos, take part in assignments, lend your voice to stories, and connect with fellow photographers from around the globe.
  • Shades of Green

    25 Jul 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Fitzroy Gardens in Melbourne, Australia, takes on an ethereal quality in the light of a streetlamp, emanating deep hues of jade and emerald. “It reminds me of somewhere magical out of a fairy-tale story, a small piece of tranquility in the middle of a bustling city,” writes Luke Aveil, a contributor to Your Shot. Named after Sir Charles Augustus Fitzroy, the gardens receive over two million visitors each year. This photo was submitted to Your Shot. Check out the new and improved website, where you can share photos, take part in assignments, lend your voice to stories, and connect with…
  • Surf and Turf

    JoeHsu
    24 Jul 2014 | 9:00 pm
    A surfer rides a wave as it crashes onto the shore at Palm Beach in New South Wales, Australia, giving the ocean an otherworldly appearance. Palm Beach, a northern suburb of Sydney, is home to two Surf Life Saving clubs—one dating back to 1921. This photo and caption were submitted to the 2014 National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest. Winners will be announced July 31. Browse editors' favorites and download wallpapers »
 
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    News Watch

  • 101 Geysers Spotted Erupting From Saturn Moon

    Dan Vergano
    28 Jul 2014 | 3:28 pm
      Dramatic plumes, both large and small, spray water ice and vapor from many locations along the famed “tiger stripes” near the south pole of Saturn’s moon Enceladus. Courtesy NASA/JPL Erupting from fractures, 101 geysers dot the surface of Saturn’s frozen moon, Enceladus, report NASA scientists. First spotted as plumes in 2005, the total number of geysers has been revealed by a long series of overflights by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft. The geysers are “not a near-surface phenomenon but have much deeper roots,”  says Cassini imaging team  leader…
  • July 27, 2014 Radio Show: Curing Cancer, Spending Summer Nights With Fireflies and More

    Justin O'Neill
    28 Jul 2014 | 2:42 pm
    Fireflies, a type of beetle that has been around for millions of years, first started to glow as larvae. Now, the adults of many types of fireflies use their lights to warn off predators and attract mates. (photo by Paul Zahl/National Geographic) Every week, embark with host Boyd Matson on an exploration of the latest discoveries and interviews with some of the most fascinating people on the planet, on National Geographic Weekend. Please check listings near you to find the best way to listen to National Geographic Weekend on radio, or listen below! Hour 1 - When a close family friend of Jack…
  • 4 Sky Events This Week: Cosmic Dumbbell and Lunar Lineup

    Andrew Fazekas
    28 Jul 2014 | 9:36 am
    The Dumbbell Nebula, a remnant of a dying star some 1,300 light-years from Earth, is a favorite summertime target for backyard telescopes. Courtesy REU program/NOAO/AURA/NSF With the moon out of the night sky this week, some far-off treasures come to light. A planetary alignment with the stars adds to the delight. Dumbbell Nebula. With the moon out of the evening sky for much of the week, this is a perfect time to hunt for deep-sky targets—celestial objects that lie outside our solar system. One summertime favorite is a dying-star remnant known as the Dumbbell Nebula or Messier 27. …
  • B is for Boma, K is for Kraal

    Stuart Pimm
    27 Jul 2014 | 8:28 am
    Stuart Pimm and Lise Hanssen outside one of her kraals Photo Rudi van Aarde I’m just south of the Zambezi river, in the Caprivi, the long eastern panhandle of Namibia that stretches from the Okavango River to Victoria falls. Angola and Zambia are only 40 miles away to the north, Botswana 10 to the south, and Zimbabwe less than 150 to the east. It’s certainly Africa’s most geographically complicated place — a legacy of the European powers’ 19th century scramble for colonies. It’s also one of Africa’s most impressive areas for wildlife. All five countries have established large…
  • Family Strife

    Caitlin O'Connell
    27 Jul 2014 | 7:27 am
    Mushara Waterhole, Etosha National Park, Namibia – Sunset began with a visit from Paula and Nadia and their fraction of the Athlete family. We saw them break the clearing from the southwest, and I rushed to get two of my volunteers out on their bunker observation rotation, but we were too late. They were coming in fast. I made the call to drive out east of the waterhole to watch the sunset action from the vantage of a red pan. It’s been very gratifying to see that Paula has found a solution to her family strife from 2012 after giving birth to her calf, Bruce. She was under such extreme…
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    Intelligent Travel

  • Pay Less to Phone Home

    Christopher Elliott
    28 Jul 2014 | 8:35 am
    National Geographic Traveler Editor at Large Christopher Elliott is the magazine’s consumer advocate and ombudsman. Over the past 15 years he has helped countless readers fix their trips. Here’s his latest advice: Reader Question: I’m an American taking a two-week trip to Norway. How do I inexpensively call family back home? My Answer: Don’t purchase a pricey international plan from your wireless carrier. For example, AT&T’s least expensive rate costs an extra $30 per month and charges $1 a minute for your calls in Scandinavia. Instead, when you get to your destination,…
  • Nat Geo Staff Picks: America’s Best Beach Towns

    Leslie Trew Magraw
    25 Jul 2014 | 9:47 am
    Is there a magic formula for the perfect beach town? No, but America could offer up more than a few candidates if they were doling out the title. Here are just a few of them, recommended by Nat Geo Travel staffers: Cannon Beach, Oregon: “At only an hour-and-a-half drive away, Cannon Beach was an easy day trip from Portland, where I used to live. With access to scenic hiking trails at Ecola State Park, great views of the towering Haystack Rock (which made a memorable appearance in the 1985 coming-of-age classic The Goonies), and a number of mom-and-pop stores and restaurants, Cannon…
  • Insider’s Guide to Sweden’s West Coast

    Intelligent Travel
    25 Jul 2014 | 6:55 am
    A favorite of the late Ingrid Bergman, the Bohuslän coast feels a bit like a secret French Riviera. What the high-latitude region lacks in American tourists it makes up for with plentiful seafood and bright seasonal sunshine. Here’s the lowdown on visiting this Swedish wonderland. > When to Go: If solitude and seafood are a priority, stick to late spring for oysters and late September for lobsters. Midsummer celebrations beginning in June linger through August, with vacationing Swedes filling the otherwise placid stillness with sailing, kayaking, and yachting. > Where to Eat:…
  • I Heart My City: Igor’s Venice

    I Heart My City
    24 Jul 2014 | 8:28 am
    Venice native Igor Scomparin led tours all over Europe with Globus for a decade before returning home to be a “local host” for Monograms. Now, this tourism industry veteran’s mission is to show the real, authentic Venice to travelers who come to visit his homeland. Here’s a look at the “city of canals” through the ultimate local’s eyes. Catch up with Igor on Twitter @tourleadervenic and on Instagram @tourleadervenice. Venice Is My City When someone comes to visit me, the first place I take them is to the lively Rialto Market. Here, they’ll see…
  • #NGTRadar: Travel Lately

    Intelligent Travel
    23 Jul 2014 | 12:48 pm
    The Radar—the latest and best from the travel blogosphere—is a regular feature on Intelligent Travel every other Wednesday. You can play, too. Follow us on Twitter @NatGeoTravel and tag your favorite travel stories #NGTRadar to help us find the crème de la crème on the Web. Here are our newest picks: Defy your inner food snob with spicy soup, beer-battered fries, and a delicious stir-fry—all made from Spam. Here are five international delicacies made with “Hormel’s treasure in a tin can,” along with two recipes for those daring enough to try them at…
 
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    Digital Nomad

  • Northeast by Train: America’s Eurail Experience

    Robert Reid
    24 Jul 2014 | 10:57 am
    One of the great things about visiting Europe is getting around by train. Even short hops get you to places with new cultures, languages, cuisines, even types of chocolate. Truth is, you can do that in the U.S., particularly along the Northeast Corridor. I’ve long wanted to do this—connect the dots by train or bus between Boston, New York, Philadelphia, and Washington, D.C., in a single trip. Now that I have, I wonder why more people don’t? It makes a lot of sense. For my trip, I picked fun city escapes that, in most cases, had escaped the notice of most travelers, and even some…
  • Finding Life in a D.C. Swamp

    Robert Reid
    18 Jul 2014 | 8:24 am
    “Here, rub this on your legs,” a man in a funny hat is saying to me. “It might help.” Walter McDowney is a national park ranger at Washington, D.C.’s Kenilworth Park and Aquatic Gardens. He’s not your usual guide. For one, he’s handing me “jewel weed” he’s picked from a thicket that could fend off poison ivy that I may or may not have tramped through already (I hadn’t). And during his tour, McDowney, who grew up across the street, points out a flower we pass. “See this plant?” he asks, poking at a small greenish bulb. “If you eat too many of its seeds, something…
  • Beyond the Dome: A Walk Around D.C.’s Secret Capitol Hill

    Robert Reid
    16 Jul 2014 | 11:51 am
    A Corgi and a Rottweillerish mutt weave between tombstones like X-wing fighters attacking the Death Star. Over by J. Edgar Hoover’s grave, which faces the city prison, two poodles slurp from a water bowl below an old-fashioned faucet. I’m learning this is just an average day at the capital’s Congressional Cemetery. “We’ve been coming here since we came to D.C. seven years ago,” one woman says in an afternoon drizzle, referring to herself and her lab, who pay $275 each year to run about the 35-acre cemetery established in 1807. The owner of the poodles adds, “I think all…
  • Philadelphia—Home to America’s Park Central

    Robert Reid
    14 Jul 2014 | 1:51 pm
    Philadelphia may not have Central Park, Millennium Park, Golden Gate Park, or the National Mall. But, quietly, it is home to the largest landscaped park in the United States. Fairmount Park, and its associated 60-some parks, fill 9,200 acres of green space in the City of Brotherly Love. That’s over 10 times the size of Central Park (843 acres). It took form in the 1840s but is linked to a 17th-century pastoral vision William Penn had for  “Liberty Lands” in the present-day northwest of the city. Philadelphia was thinking green before anybody. Why don’t more of us outsiders know…
  • Philadelphia, Birthplace of the American Weird

    Robert Reid
    10 Jul 2014 | 2:07 pm
    It’s fun to watch Austin, Texas, and Portland, Oregon, debate who’s weirder. Both cities—bastions of progressive ideas in (mostly) conservative states—have “Keep Austin Weird” and “Keep Portland Weird” stickers to drive the point home. But no matter how much they try, they can’t out-weird a city that hardly notices its quirks. That’s Philadelphia, the original American weird. A different type of weird. “That’s only the second time I’ve heard that,” says Robert Hicks, host of the No Bones About It video series at Philadelphia’s superb Mütter Museum, home…
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