National Geographic

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  • Goddess Dressing

    National Geographic Photo of the Day
    Stephanie Sinclair
    20 May 2015 | 9:00 pm
    In Nepal’s Kathmandu Valley, young Newari girls called kumaris are worshipped as living goddesses. Like other kumaris, Dangol, pictured here, wears special makeup for festivals. But it’s more than makeup that changes on these occasions. Former kumaris have described feeling bigger and stronger and said that heat radiates from their foreheads. See more pictures from the June 2015 feature story "Meet Nepal's Living Goddesses."
  • Mother of the Forest

    National Geographic Photo of the Day
    21 May 2015 | 9:00 pm
    “These baobab trees on Madagascar are up to 800 years old,” writes Your Shot member Marsel van Oosten. Locally known as “mother of the forest,” the baobab forms a micro-ecosystem of its own, supporting life for both animals and humans, van Oosten says. “Old hollow baobabs are a home to snakes, bats, bush babies, bees, and sometimes even humans. More importantly, the tree is an important source of water—it can store up to 4,000 liters of water in its trunk. For Africa, it is literally the tree of life.” This photo was submitted to Your Shot, our storytelling community. Check out…
  • Santa Barbara Oil Spill: What Will We Learn?

    Voices
    Maddalena Bearzi
    22 May 2015 | 11:22 am
    Two gray whales moving close to shore off the coast of California. Photograph courtesy Ocean Conservation Society A month ago, KPPC journalist Sanden Totten joined me on the Ocean Conservation Society boat during one of our regular marine mammal surveys that my research team and I conduct off Southern California. He wanted to discuss and observe first hand the increasing presence of skin lesions and physical deformities that are plaguing common bottlenose dolphins moving along the coastline. He was also curious about some of the reasons causing these lesions and the effects on the animals.
  • What’s a UNESCO Intangible?

    Intelligent Travel
    Intelligent Travel
    22 May 2015 | 10:55 am
    The Tower of Pisa. Machu Picchu. The Palace of Versailles. You know them as UNESCO World Heritage sites—places of such universal cultural value that the United Nations recognizes them. But what about the Mediterranean diet? The Peking opera? Portuguese fado? As cultural practices, they might not be the concrete places you can easily protect with a restoration, but they make the world more diverse, interesting and, well, fun. But First, What Exactly is UNESCO? Part of the mission of the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization is to designate sites of universal…
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    National Geographic Photo of the Day

  • Mother of the Forest

    21 May 2015 | 9:00 pm
    “These baobab trees on Madagascar are up to 800 years old,” writes Your Shot member Marsel van Oosten. Locally known as “mother of the forest,” the baobab forms a micro-ecosystem of its own, supporting life for both animals and humans, van Oosten says. “Old hollow baobabs are a home to snakes, bats, bush babies, bees, and sometimes even humans. More importantly, the tree is an important source of water—it can store up to 4,000 liters of water in its trunk. For Africa, it is literally the tree of life.” This photo was submitted to Your Shot, our storytelling community. Check out…
  • Goddess Dressing

    Stephanie Sinclair
    20 May 2015 | 9:00 pm
    In Nepal’s Kathmandu Valley, young Newari girls called kumaris are worshipped as living goddesses. Like other kumaris, Dangol, pictured here, wears special makeup for festivals. But it’s more than makeup that changes on these occasions. Former kumaris have described feeling bigger and stronger and said that heat radiates from their foreheads. See more pictures from the June 2015 feature story "Meet Nepal's Living Goddesses."
  • Market Talk

    19 May 2015 | 9:00 pm
    While at the Noryangjin Fish Market in Seoul, South Korea, Your Shot member Brian Hammonds was drawn to the contrast of the blues in the displays and the reds and pinks worn by the women seen here. An elevated walkway at the front of the market allowed Hammond to capture the scene from above. This photo was submitted to Your Shot, our storytelling community. Check out the new book Getting Your Shot for more photos, plus tips and creative insights from Nat Geo experts.
  • Dome Light

    Copyright Matthew Saville Baldon
    18 May 2015 | 9:00 pm
    “As technology shrinks the world around us, it becomes more and more difficult to find ourselves truly lost in the outdoors,” writes Your Shot member Matthew Saville. “This makes those particular moments and scenes that much more special.” Saville captured this shot of a tent on Half Dome’s Diving Board while camping in Yosemite National Park. “Getting to the Diving Board was quite a challenge, as there is no official trail,” he writes. “For anybody who is prepared, careful, and respectful of nature, the reward is one of the most breathtaking views in all of Yosemite, in my…
  • Double Trouble

    17 May 2015 | 9:00 pm
    Ethel the Great Dane attempts the impossible on a spring day in northern Kentucky. “I am constantly drawn to her eternal optimism in attempting to catch balls thrown her way, only to be defeated by her gangly legs” and just-a-beat-off timing, writes Your Shot member Danielle Mussman. “Ultimately, the photos of her missing the ball are always more amusing than those of her finally succeeding in catching it.” Mussman’s husband thought he might improve the odds by slowly tossing two balls in Ethel’s direction. “The result?” writes Mussman. “Double the confusion, double the…
 
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    Voices

  • Santa Barbara Oil Spill: What Will We Learn?

    Maddalena Bearzi
    22 May 2015 | 11:22 am
    Two gray whales moving close to shore off the coast of California. Photograph courtesy Ocean Conservation Society A month ago, KPPC journalist Sanden Totten joined me on the Ocean Conservation Society boat during one of our regular marine mammal surveys that my research team and I conduct off Southern California. He wanted to discuss and observe first hand the increasing presence of skin lesions and physical deformities that are plaguing common bottlenose dolphins moving along the coastline. He was also curious about some of the reasons causing these lesions and the effects on the animals.
  • A Day to Celebrate the Diversity of Life

    Sandra Postel
    22 May 2015 | 10:10 am
    A baby black skimmer (Rynchops niger) in the Colorado River Delta in Mexico. Photo credit: Pronatura Noroeste Today is the International Day for Biological Diversity, a day to celebrate the amazing richness of life that shares this planet with us. Though we rarely think about it, it’s the behind-the-scenes work of bugs and birds, fish and frogs, flowers and trees, and micro-organisms of every stripe that keep earth humming and the landscape around us so beautiful and alive. But just about everywhere, and especially in the world of freshwater, life is in trouble. In North America, four in…
  • Before Today, I Thought You Were Dead: Video Messages Cross a Border When Families Can’t

    Jaclyn Skurie and Madeleine May
    21 May 2015 | 2:24 pm
    Episode 5: The Conclusion In the fifth and final installment of Through the Prides, we look to the future of immigration through Kruger Park. With a growing military presence in the park as a response to rhino poaching, people on either side of the fence face more danger than ever before in attempting to walk through to see their family members separated by war and migration. We travel to Mozambique to meet the family of Constance Nyathi (from Episode 1) and learn what continues to drive people to immigrate across the border. Meanwhile in South Africa, Constance decides if she will…
  • Winter in the Subantarctic: A Short Film

    James Russell
    21 May 2015 | 2:07 pm
    In 2013 the National Geographic Society Committee for Research and Exploration funded our expedition to Subantarctic Antipodes Island. Winter in the Subantarctic is a short film (2015) recorded on that expedition which details the history of Antipodes Island and the challenges scientists must overcome working in such a remote environment. The film also details the research undertaken by the team of scientists during the expedition, in preparation for the eradication of mice and restoration of the island. On their revamped webpage the New Zealand Department of Conservation has also just…
  • Video: WRI President & CEO Andrew Steer Congratulates C40 on 10th Anniversary

    C40 News Team
    21 May 2015 | 12:22 pm
    Editor’s Note: 2015 marks C40’s 10-year anniversary. To celebrate our 10 Years of Results, we are featuring the voices of C40 principals, partners and other thought leaders throughout the year. World Resources Institute President & CEO Andrew Steer congratulates C40 on 10 years of results. World Resources Institute has been a knowledge partner with C40 for many years. Notably, the two organisations worked together to help establish the Global Protocol for Community-Scale greenhouse Gas Emission Inventories (GPC), the gold standard for emissions measurement used in the Compact of…
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    Intelligent Travel

  • What’s a UNESCO Intangible?

    Intelligent Travel
    22 May 2015 | 10:55 am
    The Tower of Pisa. Machu Picchu. The Palace of Versailles. You know them as UNESCO World Heritage sites—places of such universal cultural value that the United Nations recognizes them. But what about the Mediterranean diet? The Peking opera? Portuguese fado? As cultural practices, they might not be the concrete places you can easily protect with a restoration, but they make the world more diverse, interesting and, well, fun. But First, What Exactly is UNESCO? Part of the mission of the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization is to designate sites of universal…
  • Can Flying Coach Get Any Worse?

    Christopher Elliott
    22 May 2015 | 8:36 am
    National Geographic Traveler editor at large Christopher Elliott is the magazine’s consumer advocate and ombudsman. Over the past 15 years he has helped countless readers fix their trips. Here’s his latest advice: Reader question: Can the coach flying experience get any worse? My answer: For years, airlines have been cutting services to keep base fares low. In February of 2015, Delta’s basic economy class tickets became nonrefundable and ineligible for upgrades. The next squeeze is likely to be felt with seats getting moved closer together. Discount carriers such as Spirit…
  • Just Back: Charlottesville, Virginia

    Intelligent Travel
    21 May 2015 | 2:12 pm
    Heather Brady, digital editorial specialist at National Geographic, recently returned from a long weekend getaway in Charlottesville, Virginia. Here are some of the high points of her trip, in her own words: Craveable culinary experience: C-VILLE Weekly named Mas Tapas the best restaurant in town, and it’s pretty clear why. The Spanish-inspired small plates are divine, the sangria roja is strong and sweet, and the ambiance is funky and cool. Jefferson’s Monticello (Photograph by Heather Brady) Standout museum: Monticello. The plantation Thomas Jefferson designed and dubbed…
  • World Calendar: Must-Attend June Events

    Intelligent Travel
    21 May 2015 | 12:55 pm
    There are some amazing events on tap all over the world, all the time. Here’s a taste of what you can see and do in June:  Want to experience the shortest day of the year in one of the most beautiful places in the world? Book your tickets to Cusco, Peru, for Inti Raymi, a traditional Inca celebration of the winter solstice that pays homage to the god Inti with colorful costumes, live reenactments, and a royal procession that you have to see to believe. Culture hounds, take note: The epic Athens and Epidaurus Festival is back for its 60th year. Take in theater, opera, classical…
  • I Heart My City: Ludo’s Paris

    I Heart My City
    20 May 2015 | 3:11 pm
    Thirteen years ago, Ludo Yken moved to Paris to complete his studies and found that he never wanted to leave. In addition to feasting on the City of Love’s impressive spread of cultural attractions and green spaces, the media industry professional found another reason to stay: the locals. “The people are much nicer than their bad reputation may suggest,” Ludo says. Inspired by his adopted home city, he decided to start Paris Offbeat, a tour company that introduces travelers to what he describes as “the Paris I know and not the one you find in travel…
 
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