National Geographic

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  • First Nation Tribe Discovers Grizzly Bear "Highway" in Its Backyard

    National Geographic News: Animals
    Jane J. Lee
    22 Jul 2014 | 9:13 am
    Canada's Heiltsuk people discover more grizzlies living in their midst than they thought.
  • Ancient Native Americans Ate Pachyderms; Site Challenges Theory of Where New World Culture Began

    National Geographic News: Ancient World
    Gloria Dickie
    22 Jul 2014 | 11:53 am
    What's for supper? In ancient Mexico, early Native Americans dined on elephant-like gomphotheres, archaeologists report.
  • Q&A: The 5 Ingredients Needed for Life Beyond Earth

    National Geographic News: Space and Tech
    Mike Lemonick
    25 Jun 2014 | 4:36 am
    Liquid water and an energy source top list for what's needed for life to exist on other planets.
  • Sweet Dreams

    National Geographic Photo of the Day
    Zab Coloma
    21 Jul 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Dancers catch a few winks on the pavement before a performance at the Philippine International Convention Center in Manila. “Since they were designated the penultimate number, they decided to take a nap so they would be adequately rested when their time came,” writes Zab Coloma, a member of our Your Shot community. Coloma’s picture recently appeared in Your Shot’s Daily Dozen. This photo was submitted to Your Shot. Check out the new and improved website, where you can share photos, take part in assignments, lend your voice to stories, and connect with fellow photographers from around…
  • Places, Experiences and Objects to Dream About

    News Watch
    Kike Calvo
    22 Jul 2014 | 12:23 pm
    This post is the first in the series Places, Experiences and Objects to Dream About, which profiles marvelous locations, unique life experiences and objects of interest to modern explorers that Kike discovers during his travels. Antarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus gazella). Stromness (South Georgia). Photo © KIKE CALVO   The idea for this new column came up as I was staring at a small fur seal puppy playing with my rubber boots in a remote island of the South Atlantic. I felt compelled to transmit the emotion, admiration, surprise and ¨overwhelmness¨ of experiencing life as a…
 
 
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    National Geographic Photo of the Day

  • Sweet Dreams

    Zab Coloma
    21 Jul 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Dancers catch a few winks on the pavement before a performance at the Philippine International Convention Center in Manila. “Since they were designated the penultimate number, they decided to take a nap so they would be adequately rested when their time came,” writes Zab Coloma, a member of our Your Shot community. Coloma’s picture recently appeared in Your Shot’s Daily Dozen. This photo was submitted to Your Shot. Check out the new and improved website, where you can share photos, take part in assignments, lend your voice to stories, and connect with fellow photographers from around…
  • Sleeping Giant

    HIDENOBU SUZUKI
    20 Jul 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Mount Fuji looms over Fujinomiya, Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan, after a heavy rainstorm. “When I took the photos in a breathless silence, I had a strong feeling that the Earth was alive and had a soul,” writes photographer Hidenobu Suzuki. Suzuki’s picture recently appeared in the Your Shot assignment Embrace the Untamed. This photo was submitted to Your Shot. Check out the new and improved website, where you can share photos, take part in assignments, lend your voice to stories, and connect with fellow photographers from around the globe.
  • Magic Eye

    19 Jul 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Hong Kong’s breathtaking skyline takes on a dizzying effect in the darkness. “It is a forest made by the buildings,” writes Your Shot member Simon Kwan, who made the one-and-a-half-hour journey to the top of Beacon Hill to capture the cityscape. This photo was submitted to Your Shot. Check out the new and improved website, where you can share photos, take part in assignments, lend your voice to stories, and connect with fellow photographers from around the globe.
  • Freeze Frame

    18 Jul 2014 | 9:00 pm
    "On my last day in Antarctica photographing emperor penguins at their nesting grounds, I came across this little hole (a little more than a foot across) in a small piece of blue ice," writes Keith Szafranski, a member of our Your Shot community. Originally hoping it would make a good frame for the landscape, Szafranski then saw a string of penguins moving toward it. "I stuck my camera with a wide-angle lens into the hole and waited." Szafranski's picture recently appeared in the Your Shot assignment Embrace the Untamed. This photo was submitted to Your Shot. Check out the new and improved…
  • En Masse

    USER ID: 2785592
    17 Jul 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Thousands of performers dance in unity at the Arirang Mass Games in Pyongyang, North Korea. In the background, schoolchildren hold colored booklets to create each “pixel” of the nation’s flag. The two-month-long festival depicts the story of North Korea through gymnastic and artistic expression. This photo and caption were submitted to the 2014 National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest. Winners will be announced July 31. Browse editors' favorites and download wallpapers »
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    News Watch

  • Places, Experiences and Objects to Dream About

    Kike Calvo
    22 Jul 2014 | 12:23 pm
    This post is the first in the series Places, Experiences and Objects to Dream About, which profiles marvelous locations, unique life experiences and objects of interest to modern explorers that Kike discovers during his travels. Antarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus gazella). Stromness (South Georgia). Photo © KIKE CALVO   The idea for this new column came up as I was staring at a small fur seal puppy playing with my rubber boots in a remote island of the South Atlantic. I felt compelled to transmit the emotion, admiration, surprise and ¨overwhelmness¨ of experiencing life as a…
  • The Night Belonged to Ozzie

    Caitlin O'Connell
    22 Jul 2014 | 10:59 am
    Mushara Waterhole, Etosha National Park, Namibia – The world’s largest land creature stood on me last night—two giant feet over my head, putting me at a disturbing eye-level vantage with a dripping elephant phallus in the dark. It has occurred to me over the course of my research that an untimely end could happen to anyone studying these larger-than-life animals, but this is not something I ever thought I’d live to tell about. Ozzie’s powerful scent betrayed him well before he arrived. Then I heard branches breaking just outside the bunker where we hid our microphone. The heavy…
  • Elephants Have 2,000 Genes for Smell—Most Ever Found

    Christine Dell'Amore
    22 Jul 2014 | 10:00 am
    We’ve long known that African elephants have a great sense of smell—but a new study shows that the large mammals have truly superior schnozzes. Compared with 13 other mammal species studied, African elephants have the most genes related to smell: 2,000. A young African elephant in Amboseli, Kenya. Photograph by João Nuno Gonçalves, National Geographic Your Shot That’s the most ever discovered in an animal—more than twice the number of olfactory genes in domestic dogs and five times more than in humans, who have about 400, according to research published July 22 in the…
  • Bats Set Their Internal Compass at Dusk—A First Among Mammals

    Katie Langin
    22 Jul 2014 | 8:30 am
    Bats are creatures of the night. Even under the cover of total darkness, they can maneuver around trees, chase down moths, and find their way home—but they would still be lost without light, according to a new study. Greater mouse-eared bats set their internal magnetic compass using the pattern of light polarization—light that vibratesin one direction—at dusk, according to the study, published Tuesday in the journal Nature Communications. A greater mouse-eared bat (Myotis myotis) drinks from the water surface. Photograph by Dietmar Nill/FN/Minden Picture Without the proper light…
  • Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #71

    Steve Boyes
    21 Jul 2014 | 8:47 pm
    Woodpeckers, nutcrackers, flycatchers, sunbirds, roadrunners and babblers in this 71st Edition! Astonishing what can be achieved with a bit of patience, care and a passion for birds. Wild birds have become the subject of choice for thousands of photographers around the world. They extremely hard to photograph. You need the best equipment you have access to or the bush skills of someone that grew up in the area. I have spent hours at my bird feeder, a nearby waterhole, or by the river. Many wild birds become easily habituated to our presence and will sometimes let us into their secret lives.
 
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    Intelligent Travel

  • Happy 75th, Cooperstown!

    Intelligent Travel
    22 Jul 2014 | 11:05 am
    No need for an umpire’s call:Cooperstown, New York, runs on baseball. And as the Baseball Hall of Fame celebrates its 75th anniversary in 2014, baseball lovers can cheer more than one milestone. July also brings a new batch of inductees (including star players Frank Thomas, Greg Maddux, and Tom Glavine) following last year’s steroids-disqualified dry spell. But some things never change: The induction ceremony, to take place on July 27, draws an endless stream of baseball fanatics from across the country, who hold their caps and grow misty-eyed when approaching their heroes. Living legends…
  • Shoot One to Save the Rest?

    Costas Christ
    22 Jul 2014 | 9:37 am
    In early 2014, the Dallas Safari Club, a Texas-based hunting outfit, came up with an unconventional idea for protecting the critically endangered African black rhino: Auction a permit to shoot one and donate the money for conservation. An international furor followed, pitting pro-trophy-hunting groups and wildlife conservation advocates against each other. One side pointed out that the targeted rhino was an old male well past reproductive age. The other side argued that killing endangered animals for sport—even to raise funds for conservation causes—sends a contradictory message. Namibia,…
  • Empires of the Silk Road

    Guest Blogger
    21 Jul 2014 | 1:40 pm
    By David A. Taylor  I had only walked three minutes from my hotel in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan’s capital, when I stumbled upon a former empire. Coming to Kyrgyzstan last fall, I wanted to see what remained of the Silk Road that snaked through that spiky Central Asian country for centuries, bridging the vastness of Asia and the West with caravans bearing silk, gems, and spices. In the ancient city of Osh in the south, for instance, remnants of Asian, Russian, and Persian realms still weave together in surprising ways. That crisp morning in Bishkek I paused at bouquets of flowers leaning against a…
  • Sailing Through Central Park

    Intelligent Travel
    21 Jul 2014 | 9:58 am
    Central Park is the ultimate Manhattan playground. Here’s where to go and what to do in this 843-acre family-friendly wonderland. > The Lake The scoop: Once a large swamp, now a picturesque 18-acre lake and stopover point for herons, egrets, and other migrating birds in spring and fall. What to do: Rent a rowboat at the Loeb Boathouse ($15 an hour), and head out for some pleasantly aimless rowing. Borrow binoculars at Belvedere Castle. > The Zoo The scoop: No, the zebras and lions of Madagascar don’t really live here. But there are 130 species ranging from red pandas to…
  • Hiking and History in Italy’s Dolomites

    Intelligent Travel
    18 Jul 2014 | 2:41 pm
    When World War I broke out, Italy’s Dolomites became a treacherous front line for Austrian and Italian soldiers. Here among the jagged peaks and sheer pastel walls of this ancient range of the Alps, where many cultures had coexisted for centuries, soldiers on both sides built networks of bolted-down steel cables, called via ferrata (iron path), to move supplies quickly—and for other missions, too. “Soldiers came down the mountains at night to exchange family news with their relatives,” says hiking guide Karin Pizzinini. As the world marks the war’s centennial, travelers can explore…
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    Digital Nomad

  • Finding Life in a D.C. Swamp

    Robert Reid
    18 Jul 2014 | 8:24 am
    “Here, rub this on your legs,” a man in a funny hat is saying to me. “It might help.” Walter McDowney is a national park ranger at Washington, D.C.’s Kenilworth Park and Aquatic Gardens. He’s not your usual guide. For one, he’s handing me “jewel weed” he’s picked from a thicket that could fend off poison ivy that I may or may not have tramped through already (I hadn’t). And during his tour, McDowney, who grew up across the street, points out a flower we pass. “See this plant?” he asks, poking at a small greenish bulb. “If you eat too many of its seeds, something…
  • Beyond the Dome: A Walk Around D.C.’s Secret Capitol Hill

    Robert Reid
    16 Jul 2014 | 11:51 am
    A Corgi and a Rottweillerish mutt weave between tombstones like X-wing fighters attacking the Death Star. Over by J. Edgar Hoover’s grave, which faces the city prison, two poodles slurp from a water bowl below an old-fashioned faucet. I’m learning this is just an average day at the capital’s Congressional Cemetery. “We’ve been coming here since we came to D.C. seven years ago,” one woman says in an afternoon drizzle, referring to herself and her lab, who pay $275 each year to run about the 35-acre cemetery established in 1807. The owner of the poodles adds, “I think all…
  • Philadelphia—Home to America’s Park Central

    Robert Reid
    14 Jul 2014 | 1:51 pm
    Philadelphia may not have Central Park, Millennium Park, Golden Gate Park, or the National Mall. But, quietly, it is home to the largest landscaped park in the United States. Fairmount Park, and its associated 60-some parks, fill 9,200 acres of green space in the City of Brotherly Love. That’s over 10 times the size of Central Park (843 acres). It took form in the 1840s but is linked to a 17th-century pastoral vision William Penn had for  “Liberty Lands” in the present-day northwest of the city. Philadelphia was thinking green before anybody. Why don’t more of us outsiders know…
  • Philadelphia, Birthplace of the American Weird

    Robert Reid
    10 Jul 2014 | 2:07 pm
    It’s fun to watch Austin, Texas, and Portland, Oregon, debate who’s weirder. Both cities—bastions of progressive ideas in (mostly) conservative states—have “Keep Austin Weird” and “Keep Portland Weird” stickers to drive the point home. But no matter how much they try, they can’t out-weird a city that hardly notices its quirks. That’s Philadelphia, the original American weird. A different type of weird. “That’s only the second time I’ve heard that,” says Robert Hicks, host of the No Bones About It video series at Philadelphia’s superb Mütter Museum, home…
  • Roaming the Bronx’s “Champs-Élysées”

    Robert Reid
    8 Jul 2014 | 8:52 am
    The man with graying dreadlocks raking outside a New York mansion is hip-hop pioneer Kool DJ Herc. He hasn’t switched careers, but is an artist-in-residence helping out at the Andrew Freedman Home, a one-time “country club” retirement home that’s now a workspace for graffiti artists, a 1920s-styled bed-and-breakfast, and space for homegrown art and theater. Up the street, a yoga class is under way outside Edgar Allan Poe’s 200-year-old cottage. Farther south, the intricate Beaux Arts façade of the 1913 Opera House, where Houdini once did tricks, is a newly opened hotel that fancies…
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