National Geographic

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  • Colorful World of Birding Has Conspicuous Lack of People of Color

    National Geographic News: Animals
    Martha Hamilton
    23 Sep 2014 | 5:48 am
    Most bird-watchers are white. If that can change, it would be in everyone's best interest.
  • Amazon Warriors' Names Revealed Amid "Gibberish" on Ancient Greek Vases

    National Geographic News: Ancient World
    Dan Vergano
    23 Sep 2014 | 1:00 am
    Meet Worthy of Armor, Don't Fail, and Hot Flanks, ancient Scythian names for woman Amazon warriors, now revealed on Greek vases.
  • Blessed Beast

    National Geographic Photo of the Day
    22 Sep 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Traditions endure in the Svaneti region, high in Georgia’s Caucasus Mountains. Here, a bull with candles on its horns is blessed at a tenth-century church near the town of Mestia before being sacrificed for a February feast dating from pre-Christian times. See more pictures from the October 2014 feature story “Medieval Mountain Hideaway.”
  • What’s That Weird Purple Sea Creature? Explaining Viral Video

    News Watch
    Stefan Sirucek
    23 Sep 2014 | 8:31 am
    It may look like a billowing piece of garbage, but this odd-looking purple creature is actually a rare discovery that has scientists giddy with excitement. Scientists aboard the E/V Nautilus research vessel, led by Titanic discoverer and National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Robert Ballard, recently recorded this siphonophore swimming at the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico (map). Siphonophores, a member of the phylum Cnidariaare among the group of organisms that includes the famous—and famously painful when it stings—Portuguese man-of-war. Siphonophores are not actually jellyfish;…
  • Royal Romps on the Thames

    Intelligent Travel
    Intelligent Travel
    22 Sep 2014 | 7:41 am
    London isn’t just for grown-ups. Here are three engaging places where families can learn hands-on history with a royal twist in the English capital. > Tower of London The Scoop: Approximately three dozen Yeoman Warders (popularly known as Beefeaters) and their families share this medieval fortress with eight ravens, several ghosts, and glittering collections of jewels and armor. What to Do: Tours by Beefeaters combine spooky stories with witty banter (“It’s great living in a palace until you try to order a takeaway”). Creepier still are the winter Tower Twilight…
 
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    National Geographic Photo of the Day

  • Blessed Beast

    22 Sep 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Traditions endure in the Svaneti region, high in Georgia’s Caucasus Mountains. Here, a bull with candles on its horns is blessed at a tenth-century church near the town of Mestia before being sacrificed for a February feast dating from pre-Christian times. See more pictures from the October 2014 feature story “Medieval Mountain Hideaway.”
  • Hay Kids

    21 Sep 2014 | 9:00 pm
    A road trip to Poland’s Masurian Lake District included this moment of summertime joy for the traveling family of Your Shot member Malgorzata Walkowska. “Being impressed with the beauty of the landscape, we decided to make a stop by this field of hay bales and take some nature shots,” writes Walkowska. “Before I knew it, my niece—who trains in gymnastics—was happily jumping from one bale to another, presenting her skills.” Walkowska’s picture recently appeared in Your Shot's Daily Dozen. This photo was submitted to Your Shot. Check out the new and improved website, where you…
  • Green Day

    20 Sep 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Famous for changing the color of their skin, chameleons are more like mood rings, with their color changes reflecting mood, temperature, light, and other stimuli. Le Boulanger’s picture recently appeared in the Your Shot assignment Not Your Average Pet. This photo was submitted to Your Shot. Check out the new and improved website, where you can share photos, take part in assignments, lend your voice to stories, and connect with fellow photographers from around the globe.
  • Hazy Arizona

    Copyright Peter Essick 2014 All Rights Reserved
    19 Sep 2014 | 9:00 pm
    The American West faces persistent drought, whether or not relief comes this winter. The population of the Phoenix area (Sun City is pictured here) grew four times larger between 1970 and 2010. The Central Arizona Project, a 336-mile-long system of canals and pipelines, carries Colorado River water through the desert to the Phoenix metro area. See more pictures from October 2014 feature article "When the Snows Fail."
  • Wishful Thinking

    18 Sep 2014 | 9:00 pm
    “The sky transformed itself into a splendid and surreal sea of lanterns carrying all kinds of wishes,” writes Your Shot member Sherry Zhao of the scene at the Yi Peng Lantern Festival in Chiang Mai, Thailand. Here, a couple makes a wish before releasing a lantern into the night sky. “This enchanted moment is truly embedded in my memory,” Zhao writes. “I’m glad I was fast enough to lie down on the ground and capture the serene moment between this young couple, who drew my attention with their sincere expressions before sending out the lantern, sending up hope.” This photo was…
 
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    News Watch

  • What’s That Weird Purple Sea Creature? Explaining Viral Video

    Stefan Sirucek
    23 Sep 2014 | 8:31 am
    It may look like a billowing piece of garbage, but this odd-looking purple creature is actually a rare discovery that has scientists giddy with excitement. Scientists aboard the E/V Nautilus research vessel, led by Titanic discoverer and National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Robert Ballard, recently recorded this siphonophore swimming at the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico (map). Siphonophores, a member of the phylum Cnidariaare among the group of organisms that includes the famous—and famously painful when it stings—Portuguese man-of-war. Siphonophores are not actually jellyfish;…
  • Congress Needs to Think Big About Fish

    Lee Crockett
    22 Sep 2014 | 3:15 pm
    When you buy a house, do you inspect only the roof? Of course not. You look at the whole structure: the foundation, insulation, plumbing, and many other aspects that indicate the overall condition of a home. Taking a look at the big picture is wise when buying a house—and equally wise when making many other decisions, including how we conserve our oceans. And it could translate into a huge benefit for fish as well as those who enjoy or depend on them. Before setting fishing rules, fishery managers consider the health and abundance of a particular fish population, typically one population at…
  • Cosmic Dust Clouds Gravitational Wave Finding

    Dan Vergano
    22 Sep 2014 | 3:01 pm
    Dust maps of the sky show cloudy conditions as seen from the North (left) and South (right) Poles at two different wavelengths. The rectangle shows the region of the BICEP2 search for primordial gravity waves. Courtesy of ESA/Planck Headline-grabbing observations of primordial gravity waves now face cloudy prospects, suggests a newly released satellite map of cosmic dust. In March, the South Pole-based BICEP2 physics team reported seeing the surprisingly strong signature of gravitational waves in maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Filling the sky, the CMB is thought to be residual…
  • Wolf OR-7′s Journey in Photos From the Forest Floor

    Jay Simpson
    22 Sep 2014 | 12:10 pm
    National Geographic Young Explorer Jay Simpson is part of the Wolf OR-7 Expedition, a 1,200-mile adventure in the tracks of a wolf. Using an estimated GPS track of the lone Wolf OR-7, the team will mountain-bike and hike across Oregon and Northern California. Their aim is to raise awareness of local strategies that make on-the-ground strides toward human and wolf coexistence in the region. Follow the full story at or7expedition.org or Facebook.com/or7expedition. Items seen along the 1,200-mile dispersal route across Oregon and into Northern California. (Photos by Jay Simpson) During the days…
  • September 21, 2014: Living At Sea for 3 Years, Uncovering The Largest Ever Carnivore and More

    Justin O'Neill
    22 Sep 2014 | 11:59 am
    Spinosaurus, the 50 foot long carnivore dominated the landscape in a period of huge meat-eaters. (image by Davide Bonadonna/National Geographic) Every week, embark with host Boyd Matson on an exploration of the latest discoveries and interviews with some of the most fascinating people on the planet, on National Geographic Weekend. Please check listings near you to find the best way to listen to National Geographic Weekend on radio, or listen below! HOUR 1 - Russia’s Valeri Polyakov holds the record for a single space flight, setting it in 1995 after staying aboard the Mir space station…
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    Intelligent Travel

  • Royal Romps on the Thames

    Intelligent Travel
    22 Sep 2014 | 7:41 am
    London isn’t just for grown-ups. Here are three engaging places where families can learn hands-on history with a royal twist in the English capital. > Tower of London The Scoop: Approximately three dozen Yeoman Warders (popularly known as Beefeaters) and their families share this medieval fortress with eight ravens, several ghosts, and glittering collections of jewels and armor. What to Do: Tours by Beefeaters combine spooky stories with witty banter (“It’s great living in a palace until you try to order a takeaway”). Creepier still are the winter Tower Twilight…
  • Best National Parks: White-Water Edition

    Intelligent Travel
    19 Sep 2014 | 12:11 pm
    Rapids, whirlpools, and risky currents transform some national park rivers into raging infernos and white water. Rafts and kayaks are the best ways to experience the big thrills and spills. Most of these routes can be run in a half or single day, though some are a ripe two days of adventure with a much needed breather in between. Here are six white-water wonderlands in America’s national parks: > Snake River, Grand Teton National Park (Wyoming) Only a small portion of the 1,000-mile Snake River flows through the Tetons, but it’s about as gorgeous as a river can get, with…
  • Hail, Scotland

    Keith Bellows
    19 Sep 2014 | 10:29 am
    It’s difficult to be entirely dispassionate about something that has been in my family for centuries. So, full disclosure: ​Throughout the do-we-go, do-we-stay debate on Scottish independence, I’ve been on the side of staying the course with the U.K. My family blood runs deep tartan and has seen its share of uprisings—none that have proved to advance the cause of a free Scotland. I’m half Scot, and celebrate great occasions wearing my ancestral MacPherson kilt and regalia. I’m a descendent of Cluny MacPherson, who was chief of the Clan Chattan at the time of the 1745…
  • Wine Tasting 101

    James Conaway
    19 Sep 2014 | 6:46 am
    Wine drinking’s pretty much self-explanatory. But no matter what’s in the glass, it will reveal itself best when approached systematically and when all sensory apparati are exposed to it (well, not your ears). That doesn’t mean making a spectacle of your examination, or trying to out-inhale the person next to you. It does mean thinking about wine from the get-go as special and maybe extraordinary, and taking great care to remember your initial impressions. You can tell a lot about a wine without actually tasting it. By the time you do, you’ll know something about its assets and…
  • Finding A Sense of Home Abroad

    Don George
    18 Sep 2014 | 11:23 am
    The taxi driver hoisted my suitcase on his shoulder, stepped gingerly around the puddles and slopped through the mud on the earthen path to my homestay family’s stilt house. He had just driven me three and a half hours north of Siem Reap, into the bucolic rice-fields-and-palm-trees wilds of northern Cambodia, a half hour from the Thai border. Sophal, the smiling, soft-spoken village resident who had coordinated my homestay, sloshed with us onto the concrete-paved living area under the second story of my host family’s wooden home. A middle-aged couple, the man in a polo shirt and shorts…
 
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    Digital Nomad

  • Pierre Parallel: A Detour into Secret South Dakota

    Robert Reid
    17 Sep 2014 | 10:35 am
    “No problem. I’ll be up there as quick as I can get my pants on.” The morning rain has stopped and I’m standing outside a cute century-old red-plank train depot by a grain elevator in Midland, South Dakota. I’ve called one of the three seven- digit numbers listed on the depot’s handmade sign, and in five minutes I meet Mahlon Alcock, a retired rancher. He’s not wearing pants after all, but a baggy pair of blue-and-white Big Mac overalls and a VIP Club ball cap. He’s 91 and drops a cuss word every other sentence as he walks me around hundreds of…
  • Finding Space in the Black Hills

    Robert Reid
    11 Sep 2014 | 1:06 pm
    I’m in a wide-open field of grass. Hundreds of bugs the size of a pencil lead mark scramble across my shirt and arms. Pretty much what I asked for. “This is what the prairie used to be,” a silver-haired ranger had promised, pointing to the northeast corner of South Dakota’s Wind Cave National Park—away from the hordes lining up to go on tours of one of the world’s biggest cave systems. After brushing the bugs off, like you see pioneer types do in Oregon Trail movies, I feel at ease in the mixed-grass prairie playland. (The ranger later could only guess they were springtail fleas,…
  • Meet Wyoming’s Bighorn

    Robert Reid
    8 Sep 2014 | 11:48 am
    “Everything’s better in the mountains. Chicken soup, coffee with the grounds in it. It’s just better up here.” Scott Schroder has spots of gray in his big red beard, and wet pants. That’s only because he decided against waders and is walking in jeans through the knee-deep South Fork of the Tongue River. He’s leading me on a fly-fishing lesson for the day, and our conversation could fill an open range. As I occasionally tangle my line in a riverside tree branch, we chat high school football, rhythm guitars, Sweden, speed limits, our late dads, Hemingway, and a few things about…
  • Gravel Valentine: A Geologist’s Guide to Wyoming

    Robert Reid
    2 Sep 2014 | 1:06 pm
    The geologist hands me a homemade brownie wrapped in a clear baggie, then points across my lap and out the window. “This glacial environment makes up one of the nicer outwash plains we have. See that line of cobbles? Then a dip, and another line of cobbles? That’s where one of the braided streams went through millions of years ago.” He directs my gaze out the opposite window of the truck, back toward the west end of the Big Hollow, a 27-square-mile dip carved by winds that zipped off glaciers during the ice age with a “Darth Vader-like power.” He adds, with apparent wonder:…
  • Chasing Purple in Rocky Mountain National Park

    Robert Reid
    28 Aug 2014 | 1:02 pm
    I came to Estes Park, Colorado, to see purple mountain majesties, blue hollows, and flaming red alpenglow. Maybe get some taffy and a T-shirt. My guide is a marked-up copy of Isabella Bird’s A Lady’s Life in the Rocky Mountainsa remarkable travelogue spun from letters the British writer wrote during her trip to Colorado in 1873. Isabella’s a fascinating figure to follow. She was 4’11”, sickly, unmarried, 42, out of shape, and apparently fearless. She traveled the world for health, and to escape the Victorian age’s expectations of a woman’s life. She wrangled cows, climbed…
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