National Geographic

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  • Century After Extinction, Passenger Pigeons Remain Iconic—And Scientists Hope to Bring Them Back

    National Geographic News: Animals
    Carl Zimmer
    31 Aug 2014 | 5:00 am
    The 100th anniversary of the last of the species finds biologists dreaming of preventing or even reversing extinctions.
  • Newly Discovered Engraving May Revise Picture of Neanderthal Intelligence

    National Geographic News: Ancient World
    Dan Vergano
    1 Sep 2014 | 12:49 pm
    A grooved carving found in a cave on Gibraltar points to symbolic thought among Neanderthals, scholars report.
  • Captured Space Dust Is Probably From Beyond Our Solar System

    National Geographic News: Space and Tech
    Michael D. Lemonick
    15 Aug 2014 | 8:01 am
    In the dust collector of a NASA probe, citizen scientists helped find particles that probably came from interstellar space—the first that could be studied on Earth.
  • Cold Encounter

    National Geographic Photo of the Day
    31 Aug 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Hoarfrost settles on a moor along the border of Espace Rambouillet, a wildlife reserve near Paris, France, that’s home to deer like this stag and other wildlife. Having heard noises on the moor one day, Your Shot member Nicolas Le Boulanger returned early the following morning “to see the author of these sounds.” He had just arrived at the path when the deer appeared. “It literally jumped up in front of me as if to block access to its secret garden,” Le Boulanger writes. “We watched each other for five minutes, and I took hundreds of photos, but many of the others were missed due…
  • The Future of the Past in Palau

    News Watch
    Enric Sala
    1 Sep 2014 | 3:37 pm
    The night was dark, and the breeze warm. Without clouds on the sky, the ancient mariner knew exactly where home was. A small tweak on the sail, and his little dugout canoe was sailing straight to his home island in the West Pacific, 400 miles north of the equator. He could guess the vague silhouette of the limestone rocks covered with lush tropical forest against Orion, now setting under the horizon. Even before he could see his island, he knew exactly how far he was from it, for he could hear the waves breaking on the reef miles away. He let his right hand touch the seawater softly, as if…
 
 
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    National Geographic Photo of the Day

  • Cold Encounter

    31 Aug 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Hoarfrost settles on a moor along the border of Espace Rambouillet, a wildlife reserve near Paris, France, that’s home to deer like this stag and other wildlife. Having heard noises on the moor one day, Your Shot member Nicolas Le Boulanger returned early the following morning “to see the author of these sounds.” He had just arrived at the path when the deer appeared. “It literally jumped up in front of me as if to block access to its secret garden,” Le Boulanger writes. “We watched each other for five minutes, and I took hundreds of photos, but many of the others were missed due…
  • Sacred Land

    (c)Michael Melford
    30 Aug 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Patos Island, one of Washington's San Juan Islands, is part of a thousand-acre national monument created last year by President Barack Obama. Wilderness, a higher form of land protection, covers 350 acres of the San Juans. See more pictures from the September 2014 feature story “50 Years of Wilderness.”
  • Tip of the Iguana

    29 Aug 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Not quite as threatening as some sea monsters, a spiny-backed iguana floats by photographer Lorenzo Mittiga in the Bonaire Caves of the Dutch Caribbean. "There I was, fully equipped with my camera, its underwater housing, and a wide-angle lens, preparing for the final setting of the sun, when a friend interrupted my solitude," writes Mittiga, a member of our Your Shot community. “He had dived into the water above my head and was swimming around the entrance of the cave, as if to say 'hello' to me.” Mittiga’s picture recently appeared in Your Shot's Daily Dozen. This photo was submitted…
  • Under the Hill

    28 Aug 2014 | 9:00 pm
    The successors of Roman Emperor Nero largely buried his legacy from view. Beneath the Oppian Hill (at left) the remains of the palace—the Domus Aurea, or Golden House—built by and for Nero are closed to the public. By contrast, the Colosseum receives more than 10,000 visitors a day. See more pictures from the September 2014 feature story “Rethinking Nero.”
  • On the Rocks

    27 Aug 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Greenland's Inuit survived for generations eating almost nothing but meat in a landscape too harsh for most plants. Today markets offer more variety, but a taste for meat persists. The 64 residents of the remote east Greenland village of Isortoq, pictured here, still hunt and fish but combine traditional Inuit foods with purchases from the supermarket, the large red building in the foreground. A favorite dish: seal dipped in ketchup and mayonnaise. See more pictures from the September 2014 feature story “The Evolution of Diet.” See more of National Geographic’s coverage on the Future of…
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    News Watch

  • The Future of the Past in Palau

    Enric Sala
    1 Sep 2014 | 3:37 pm
    The night was dark, and the breeze warm. Without clouds on the sky, the ancient mariner knew exactly where home was. A small tweak on the sail, and his little dugout canoe was sailing straight to his home island in the West Pacific, 400 miles north of the equator. He could guess the vague silhouette of the limestone rocks covered with lush tropical forest against Orion, now setting under the horizon. Even before he could see his island, he knew exactly how far he was from it, for he could hear the waves breaking on the reef miles away. He let his right hand touch the seawater softly, as if…
  • The MPA Wave

    Monica Medina
    1 Sep 2014 | 2:23 pm
    In 2004, Australia created the first large-scale marine protected area (MPA) in the world. Its Great Barrier Reef Marine Park had been a world heritage site since 1981, but ten years ago the government of Australia did the unthinkable – they banned all fishing, both recreational and commercial, from 33% of the park. In one fell swoop, they created the most protected coral reef system in the world. Environmental leaders hailed the move, saying it set the standard for global marine conservation. The Great Barrier Reef off Queensland, Australia, Coral Sea. Photo by Gordon Gahan. Since then,…
  • Face-to-Face Conservation

    Stuart Pimm
    1 Sep 2014 | 9:44 am
    “The phone calls always seem to be on a Sunday and 1000 kilometres (600 miles) away from here” Florian Weise tells me. We’re standing next to a huge drum of diesel — “this is where the NGS Big Cats Initiative money went” he explains, filling up his pick-up for the long journey. Florian’s insights into big cat conservation have filled our last two days as we recover in the comfort of the N/a’an ku se resort outside of Windhoek, the capital of Namibia. My travelling companion, Rudi van Aarde and I appreciate the resort’s comfort and our very limited budget its hospitality.
  • Teen Pharmacist: An Unregulated Distribution of Drugs

    Sadia Ali
    1 Sep 2014 | 5:24 am
    A teenage pharmacist watches television as he answers questions about valium’s side effects upon distribution. (Photo by Sadia Ali) We spent the last 11 hours motorcycling across the country to Na Kae village just North of Vang Vieng. With no previous experience of riding a motorcycle, the thought of scaling mountains with little to no roads seemed risky, but necessary in order to meet rural and remote healers. With sunset fast approaching and the rain beating down on our backs, we had no choice but to continue with little idea of where we were and at times with no one in sight. With…
  • Whale Encounters in Arctic Svalbard

    David Braun
    31 Aug 2014 | 1:30 pm
    Whales came close to being extirpated from the waters around Svalbard after Europeans harvested them for three centuries for blubber and baleen. One species, the bowhead, also known as the Greenland right whale, was reduced from perhaps 50,000 to fewer than a hundred individuals in the archipelago midway between continental Europe and the North Pole. We did not see the now-very-rare bowhead during our weeklong cruise through Svalbard early in the summer of 2014, but our ship, National Geographic Explorer, had some dramatic encounters with humpbacks, and there were also excellent sightings of…
 
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    Intelligent Travel

  • In Search of Sustainable Travel

    Keith Bellows
    1 Sep 2014 | 8:11 am
    In the 1980s, ecotourism—driven by a deep conservation and environmental ethic—focused on remote jungle lodges, nature treks, and the like. It was well-meaning and maybe appropriate to the time, but dwelled on the fringes of a largely uninterested mainstream travel industry. At Traveler we observed this and felt a broader approach, around sustainable tourism, would prove a more powerful force to improve travelers’ interactions with the planet and push the entire industry to take notice. Our own sustainable-travel initiatives promoted cultural and natural preservation as well as the…
  • Slovenia’s Ancient Roman Holiday

    Intelligent Travel
    29 Aug 2014 | 1:04 pm
    In the 2,000 years since Caesar Augustus laid one of Ljubljana’s first stones, then for a settlement called Emona, this city has often hidden in plain sight. No longer: As Slovenia’s capital cheers its bimillenary throughout 2014, it’s putting its treasures on parade. Emonan daily life and ancient artifacts take the spotlight at the City Museum of Ljubljana and National Museum of Slovenia, and the summer’s marquee festival—Ave, Emona (“Hello” in Latin)—takes over Congress Square with military and civic reenactments. Meanwhile, Ljubljana’s modern renaissance plays out a few…
  • Travel Lens: Steve McCurry’s World

    Katie Knorovsky
    29 Aug 2014 | 7:01 am
    Through the eyes of Steve McCurry, a camera has telescopic powers. His pictures reflect the essence of the world’s most elusive cultures. In the 1980s—disguised in native garb and armed with a bag of film—he delved deep into Soviet-occupied Afghanistan. Along the way he captured the portrait of Sharbat Gula, a green-eyed refugee girl who became a global icon after appearing on a cover of National Geographic In the decades since, McCurry has documented conflict zones such as Beirut and Tibet and explored endless frontiers, from Italy to Myanmar (Burma) and India (where he has traveled at…
  • Permanent Collection: D.C.’s National Gallery

    James Conaway
    28 Aug 2014 | 11:38 am
    The National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., provides a stunning home for 4,000 European and American paintings, 3,000 sculptures, 31,000 drawings, 70,000 prints, 12,000 photographs, and much more. It’s an awesome trove, to be sure, but approaching it requires planning. Most of the art is not on display at any one time, of course, but some spectacular pieces always are, and they provide the best starting point. Finding them can be exciting, and satisfying, a treasure hunt for the aesthetically minded traveler drawn to one of the U.S. capital’s prime attractions. It helps—a…
  • Brilliant: London for Kids

    Intelligent Travel
    28 Aug 2014 | 7:58 am
    Despite its size, London is a very kid-friendly city. Almost 40 percent of the capital is dedicated to parks and public spaces, and major museums are free. The only problem is there’s so much to see. For a dizzying overview of all the attractions, take the elevator to the top of the Shard (above). At 1,004 feet, it’s the tallest building in western Europe. On a clear day, the views from the glass-walled 72nd floor can stretch for 40 miles. Tip: Don’t prebook; wait for a sunny day and be prepared to line up; $50. For a closer look at London’s landmarks, hop aboard one of Thames…
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    Digital Nomad

  • Chasing Purple in Rocky Mountain National Park

    Robert Reid
    28 Aug 2014 | 1:02 pm
    I came to Estes Park, Colorado, to see purple mountain majesties, blue hollows, and flaming red alpenglow. Maybe get some taffy and a T-shirt. My guide is a marked-up copy of Isabella Bird’s A Lady’s Life in the Rocky Mountainsa remarkable travelogue spun from letters the British writer wrote during her trip to Colorado in 1873. Isabella’s a fascinating figure to follow. She was 4’11”, sickly, unmarried, 42, out of shape, and apparently fearless. She traveled the world for health, and to escape the Victorian age’s expectations of a woman’s life. She wrangled cows, climbed…
  • Fort Collins Steers Forward, Beyond Boulder

    Robert Reid
    21 Aug 2014 | 1:16 pm
    “We bike and drink beer. And that’s pretty much it.” A barista in Fort Collins, Colorado, is describing local life here as she readies a hand-pour cup of an Ethiopian bean she calls “delicate, like a flower” (with a wink). We’re at Bean Cycle, a downtown café/printing press on a block of late 19th-century buildings that inspired Disneyland’s Main Street. “Oh, maybe you should try yoga.” Fifty-fives miles north of its acclaimed rival college town Boulder, Fort Collins has quietly remade its “aggie town” rep over the past several years.
  • The Ultimate Road Trip Through America’s Mountains and Prairies

    Robert Reid
    18 Aug 2014 | 7:05 am
    Lyrically, “America the Beautiful” covers “sea to shining sea,” but at its heart it’s about where prairies and mountains meet. Katharine Lee Bates, a schoolteacher-poet from Massachusetts, wrote it in 1895, after a trip up Pike’s Peak in Colorado Springs, where she looked east over the plains and soon found herself reaching for a pen. It is a dramatic pairing though, those purple mountains and those amber fields. They’re not always connected on itineraries, but both are partners, vast and inspiring in their own ways. The mountains’ crammed pathways amidst…
  • Northeast by Train: America’s Eurail Experience

    Robert Reid
    24 Jul 2014 | 10:57 am
    One of the great things about visiting Europe is getting around by train. Even short hops get you to places with new cultures, languages, cuisines, even types of chocolate. Truth is, you can do that in the U.S., particularly along the Northeast Corridor. I’ve long wanted to do this—connect the dots by train or bus between Boston, New York, Philadelphia, and Washington, D.C., in a single trip. Now that I have, I wonder why more people don’t? It makes a lot of sense. For my trip, I picked fun city escapes that, in most cases, had escaped the notice of most travelers, and even some…
  • Finding Life in a D.C. Swamp

    Robert Reid
    18 Jul 2014 | 8:24 am
    “Here, rub this on your legs,” a man in a funny hat is saying to me. “It might help.” Walter McDowney is a national park ranger at Washington, D.C.’s Kenilworth Park and Aquatic Gardens. He’s not your usual guide. For one, he’s handing me “jewel weed” he’s picked from a thicket that could fend off poison ivy that I may or may not have tramped through already (I hadn’t). And during his tour, McDowney, who grew up across the street, points out a flower we pass. “See this plant?” he asks, poking at a small greenish bulb. “If you eat too many of its seeds, something…
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