National Geographic

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  • Has Half of World's Wildlife Been Lost in Past 40 Years?

    National Geographic News: Animals
    Christine Dell'Amore
    30 Sep 2014 | 3:51 pm
    Wildlife populations are in decline, with numbers of some animals falling by half in the past four decades, according to the 2014 Living Planet Report.
  • Did the Vikings Get a Bum Rap?

    National Geographic News: Ancient World
    Christopher Shea
    26 Sep 2014 | 5:59 am
    A Yale historian wants us to rethink the terrible tales about the Norse.
  • Summer Pattern

    National Geographic Photo of the Day
    Sven_Zacek-www.zacekfoto.ee
    30 Sep 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Sunbathers make a haphazard pattern on the sand at Pärnu, the so-called summer capital of Estonia. Your Shot member Sven Zacek had been thinking up ideas for a book “showing the country as our national bird, the barn swallow, sees it.” One of the motifs he hoped to capture was a summer day on the beach in Pärnu, where people come together at the height of the season. “With aerial photography, the most important thing is to get the weather right,” he says. “On a July day at around 2 p.m., when the sun was at its hottest, I hired an airplane and we circled the beach and got some…
  • Missing Isotopes: What’s Happening in the World’s Highest Glaciers?

    News Watch
    Gregg Treinish
    30 Sep 2014 | 11:51 am
    Gregg Treinish and his team at Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation bring us stories from around the world about adventuring with purpose. Here, ASC staffer Emily Stifler Wolfe interviews glaciologist Dr. Natalie Kehwald about her work studying glacial thinning in the Himalayas. By Emily Stifler Wolfe Natalie Kehrwald thought she was making a mistake. As a Ph.D. student at Ohio State University in 2008, she had just returned from a 10-week expedition collecting ice cores from a glacier at 20,000 feet in Tibet. To date the ice, Kehrwald was looking for layers of radioactive isotopes…
  • The Halcyon Charms of County Mayo

    Intelligent Travel
    Keith Bellows
    30 Sep 2014 | 12:51 pm
    The four-hour drive from Dublin to the Stella Maris Country House in County Mayo unspools on a maze of country roads traversing low-slung hills, hummocks, and small towns where the pub still seems a main staple of life. So it is a soaring moment when I come to the western margin of Ireland and find myself at the barren doorstep of the Atlantic’s green rush of swells and surf. I’m reminded of a quote by Roddy Doyle, author of The Commitments, who said, “When you grow up on an island, what matters is how you stand to the sea.” As I gaze from the hotel’s 100-foot-long conservatory I…
 
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    National Geographic Photo of the Day

  • Summer Pattern

    Sven_Zacek-www.zacekfoto.ee
    30 Sep 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Sunbathers make a haphazard pattern on the sand at Pärnu, the so-called summer capital of Estonia. Your Shot member Sven Zacek had been thinking up ideas for a book “showing the country as our national bird, the barn swallow, sees it.” One of the motifs he hoped to capture was a summer day on the beach in Pärnu, where people come together at the height of the season. “With aerial photography, the most important thing is to get the weather right,” he says. “On a July day at around 2 p.m., when the sun was at its hottest, I hired an airplane and we circled the beach and got some…
  • In for a Treat

    floriankuster.com
    29 Sep 2014 | 9:00 pm
    “This beautiful, coppery-headed emerald hummingbird had been dancing with this amazing flower in the Costa Rican highlands,” writes Your Shot member Florian Kuster. “His attitude, colors, and plumage were just sublime. One can see all the details of even the smallest feather despite the fast movement of the bird’s wings.” This photo was submitted to Your Shot. Check out the new and improved website, where you can share photos, take part in assignments, lend your voice to stories, and connect with fellow photographers from around the globe.
  • Svan Rider

    28 Sep 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Centuries-old defensive towers loom over remote villages in the Svaneti region of Georgia’s Caucasus Mountains. Svans in the collection of villages that make up Ushguli—a World Heritage site—hold on to deep traditions. Horses still provide reliable transport throughout the largely roadless region. See more pictures from the October 2014 feature story “Medieval Mountain Hideaway.”
  • Withered

    27 Sep 2014 | 9:00 pm
    “I live in a typical Japanese town and often go for a walk at dusk,” writes Matsuura Tomoya, a member of our Your Shot community. “On my walking route, there are small plants that nobody ever takes any notice of growing in the cracks of the asphalt road.” Tomoya picked up some of the withered plants and used a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to capture this image. “There is even more magnificent nature existing in each small part of what we often think of as nature, and a life-and-death drama is repeatedly played out there,” he writes. See more of Tomoya’s SEM images in the…
  • On Faith

    Copyright Peter Essick 2014 All Rights Reserved
    26 Sep 2014 | 9:00 pm
    In California’s Central Valley, water in wildlife refuges is down by around 30 percent. Here, migratory geese on their journey north congregate on the Faith Ranch near the San Joaquin River National Wildlife Refuge, one of the Central Valley’s few scraps of native wildlife habitat. See more pictures from October 2014 feature article "When the Snows Fail."
 
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    News Watch

  • Missing Isotopes: What’s Happening in the World’s Highest Glaciers?

    Gregg Treinish
    30 Sep 2014 | 11:51 am
    Gregg Treinish and his team at Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation bring us stories from around the world about adventuring with purpose. Here, ASC staffer Emily Stifler Wolfe interviews glaciologist Dr. Natalie Kehwald about her work studying glacial thinning in the Himalayas. By Emily Stifler Wolfe Natalie Kehrwald thought she was making a mistake. As a Ph.D. student at Ohio State University in 2008, she had just returned from a 10-week expedition collecting ice cores from a glacier at 20,000 feet in Tibet. To date the ice, Kehrwald was looking for layers of radioactive isotopes…
  • Fisherman Rescues Drowning Eagle: Explaining Viral Video

    Stefan Sirucek
    30 Sep 2014 | 11:46 am
    When Don Dunbar went fishing on September 8, a young bald eagle probably wasn’t the catch he had in mind. But that’s what he got as he encountered the waterlogged raptor floundering in the waters of Nanoose Bay (map) in British Columbia, Canada. The raw video Dunbar shot while bringing the bird on board using a net has gone viral. (Also see “Five Bald Eagle Cams to Watch Now.”) When the stunned youngster proved unable to fly, Dunbar brought it to a local wildlife rescue center, O.W.L. Orphaned Wildlife Rehabilitation Society, of Delta, British Columbia. National Geographic…
  • Growing the Next Generation of Botanical Pioneers

    David Braun
    30 Sep 2014 | 10:54 am
    By Mike Maunder, Interim Director, The Kampong, National Tropical Botanical Garden Two weeks ago I was in South Sudan working with East African and South Sudanese colleagues preparing a plant conservation project for the Imatong Mountains. Rivers spill out of these beautiful mountain forests providing water to huge areas of South Sudan.  Yet the forests that catch and hold the rain are disappearing, felled by farmers intent on providing food for their families. The future of those forests, the threatened and endemic plant species in those forests, and the families of farmers, are all…
  • Video Time Lapse of 1,200 Miles in the Tracks of a Wolf

    Jay Simpson
    30 Sep 2014 | 6:56 am
    National Geographic Young Explorer Jay Simpson is part of the Wolf OR-7 Expedition, a 1,200-mile adventure in the tracks of a wolf. Using an estimated GPS track of the lone Wolf OR-7, the team mountain-biked and hiked across Oregon and Northern California. Their aim is to raise awareness of local strategies that make on-the-ground strides toward human and wolf coexistence in the region. Follow the full story at or7expedition.org or Facebook.com/or7expedition. Before watching this video, take a moment to think about Wolf OR-7′s 2011 route across Oregon and Northern California. In your…
  • Busting Indonesia’s Manta Gill Trade

    International League of Conservation Photographers
    29 Sep 2014 | 9:00 pm
    This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photos by iLCP Fellow Paul Hilton. A mobula ray ( Mobula japanica ) is offloaded at the Tanjung Luar fish market, 27th September 2013, Lombok, Indonesia. Photo: Paul Hilton / Greenpeace. Writing this from a hotel room in Indonesia’s second-largest city, Surabaya, I realize that I am filled with trepidation as I wait for the phone next to me to…
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    Intelligent Travel

  • The Halcyon Charms of County Mayo

    Keith Bellows
    30 Sep 2014 | 12:51 pm
    The four-hour drive from Dublin to the Stella Maris Country House in County Mayo unspools on a maze of country roads traversing low-slung hills, hummocks, and small towns where the pub still seems a main staple of life. So it is a soaring moment when I come to the western margin of Ireland and find myself at the barren doorstep of the Atlantic’s green rush of swells and surf. I’m reminded of a quote by Roddy Doyle, author of The Commitments, who said, “When you grow up on an island, what matters is how you stand to the sea.” As I gaze from the hotel’s 100-foot-long conservatory I…
  • @NatGeoTravel Staff Picks: Best Fall Trips

    Leslie Trew Magraw
    30 Sep 2014 | 10:46 am
    With the changing of the seasons comes a change in where we as travelers set our sights on going. Inspired by our latest list of best fall trips, Nat Geo Travel staffers shared their own favorite autumn escapes. Here’s a dozen to get you dreaming about your next adventure, near or far: “Call me a slave to routine, but every fall—typically in late October—I take a day off work and head to Old Rag, one of the best day hikes in the Washington, D.C., area. The route carves up several lung-burning switchbacks before graduating to one of Shenandoah National Park‘s more…
  • Keeping it Simple in the Cyclades: Ios

    Costas Christ
    29 Sep 2014 | 10:29 am
    As a new generation of Greeks reclaim their heritage, they’re looking past overtouristed islands like Mykonos to quiet stunners such as Ios Reachable only by boat (including a daily ferry from Santorini), this 42-square-mile island in the Cyclades archipelago largely retains its traditional way of life. Shepherds guide flocks through the fertile valley of Epano Kampos and along mountain footpaths. Ios’s oldest archaeological site, Skarkos, dates from the third millennium B.C., and the 16th-century monastery of Pyrgos sits below the island’s highest peak. Dirt tracks lead to more…
  • Travel Lens: Juan José Valdés’s World

    Christine Blau
    26 Sep 2014 | 3:03 pm
    Juan José Valdés puts our travel destinations on the map, literally. Is it Phnom Penh or Phnum Pénh? Cape Verde or Cabo Verde? As the lead geographer for an organization that has the word in its title, Valdés has his finger squarely on the pulse of our constantly changing world, guiding the Society’s map policy committee as it navigates hard questions such as where to draw borders, how to deal with disputed territories, and which names to include in the maps and atlases for which National Geographic is famous. But make no mistake, Valdés’s curiosity about “the world…
  • Reader Recs: Life-Changing Childhood Trips

    Megan Heltzel
    26 Sep 2014 | 9:34 am
    Traveling at a young age can be a transformative experience that leads to a lifetime of wanderlust. To celebrate the power of travel (and perhaps inspire a few parents out there), we asked our @NatGeoTravel Facebook fans to tell us about trips that made a lasting impression on them during their early years. Travel back in time with ten stories of life-changing childhood trips: At the age of 17, Linda S. traveled to Europe to visit her brother and sister-in-law, who were stationed in Naples. “I spent one week in Naples, soaking up the culture of living there, then two weeks traveling all…
 
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    Digital Nomad

  • Pierre Parallel: A Detour into Secret South Dakota

    Robert Reid
    17 Sep 2014 | 10:35 am
    “No problem. I’ll be up there as quick as I can get my pants on.” The morning rain has stopped and I’m standing outside a cute century-old red-plank train depot by a grain elevator in Midland, South Dakota. I’ve called one of the three seven- digit numbers listed on the depot’s handmade sign, and in five minutes I meet Mahlon Alcock, a retired rancher. He’s not wearing pants after all, but a baggy pair of blue-and-white Big Mac overalls and a VIP Club ball cap. He’s 91 and drops a cuss word every other sentence as he walks me around hundreds of…
  • Finding Space in the Black Hills

    Robert Reid
    11 Sep 2014 | 1:06 pm
    I’m in a wide-open field of grass. Hundreds of bugs the size of a pencil lead mark scramble across my shirt and arms. Pretty much what I asked for. “This is what the prairie used to be,” a silver-haired ranger had promised, pointing to the northeast corner of South Dakota’s Wind Cave National Park—away from the hordes lining up to go on tours of one of the world’s biggest cave systems. After brushing the bugs off, like you see pioneer types do in Oregon Trail movies, I feel at ease in the mixed-grass prairie playland. (The ranger later could only guess they were springtail fleas,…
  • Meet Wyoming’s Bighorn

    Robert Reid
    8 Sep 2014 | 11:48 am
    “Everything’s better in the mountains. Chicken soup, coffee with the grounds in it. It’s just better up here.” Scott Schroder has spots of gray in his big red beard, and wet pants. That’s only because he decided against waders and is walking in jeans through the knee-deep South Fork of the Tongue River. He’s leading me on a fly-fishing lesson for the day, and our conversation could fill an open range. As I occasionally tangle my line in a riverside tree branch, we chat high school football, rhythm guitars, Sweden, speed limits, our late dads, Hemingway, and a few things about…
  • Gravel Valentine: A Geologist’s Guide to Wyoming

    Robert Reid
    2 Sep 2014 | 1:06 pm
    The geologist hands me a homemade brownie wrapped in a clear baggie, then points across my lap and out the window. “This glacial environment makes up one of the nicer outwash plains we have. See that line of cobbles? Then a dip, and another line of cobbles? That’s where one of the braided streams went through millions of years ago.” He directs my gaze out the opposite window of the truck, back toward the west end of the Big Hollow, a 27-square-mile dip carved by winds that zipped off glaciers during the ice age with a “Darth Vader-like power.” He adds, with apparent wonder:…
  • Chasing Purple in Rocky Mountain National Park

    Robert Reid
    28 Aug 2014 | 1:02 pm
    I came to Estes Park, Colorado, to see purple mountain majesties, blue hollows, and flaming red alpenglow. Maybe get some taffy and a T-shirt. My guide is a marked-up copy of Isabella Bird’s A Lady’s Life in the Rocky Mountainsa remarkable travelogue spun from letters the British writer wrote during her trip to Colorado in 1873. Isabella’s a fascinating figure to follow. She was 4’11”, sickly, unmarried, 42, out of shape, and apparently fearless. She traveled the world for health, and to escape the Victorian age’s expectations of a woman’s life. She wrangled cows, climbed…
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