National Geographic

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  • Why Do Killer Whales Undergo Menopause?

    National Geographic News: Animals
    Jane J. Lee
    5 Mar 2015 | 9:01 am
    Female killer whales that live long past their "childbearing" days may be wise matriarchs that help their groups survive, a new study claims.
  • Pharaoh of "Lost Dynasty" Died Brutal Death, Forensic Study Reveals

    National Geographic News: Ancient World
    Nick Romeo
    3 Mar 2015 | 7:53 am
    Forgotten pharaoh may have been earliest Egyptian ruler to die in battle.
  • Spacecraft Launched to Watch Earth and Warn of Solar Storms

    National Geographic News: Space and Tech
    Dan Vergano
    12 Feb 2015 | 4:47 am
    After a decade of anticipation, the Deep Space Climate Observatory launches, watching for solar storms and observing Earth's clouds.
  • Catch of the Day

    National Geographic Photo of the Day
    4 Mar 2015 | 9:00 pm
    “The polar bears were usually playing, sleeping, and sometimes nursing,” writes Your Shot member Yoh Fong Chan of observing the bears in Kaktovik, Alaska. “They were hanging out near the shore during this time of the year, waiting for the sea to freeze before they could go out hunting for seals. On this very rare occasion, this bear came proudly from the horizon with its catch of the day.” Chan, who had long dreamed of photographing polar bears in the wild, says patience and endurance were important. “It was bitterly cold out there. As with most wildlife photography, hours were…
  • The Guardians of Raja Ampat: Driving Conservation in Remote Communities

    Voices
    International League of Conservation Photographers
    5 Mar 2015 | 7:46 am
    This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic Voices blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. THE GUARDIANS OF RAJA AMPAT FILM AND CONCERT TOUR: Driving Conservation with Grand-Scale Media in Remote Communities Text and Photos by John Weller and iLCP Fellow Shawn Heinrichs A thousand faces glowed in the light of the 2-story-tall outdoor theater screen, and the mood of the crowd changed minute to minute in reaction to the film: excited whispers and…
 
 
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    National Geographic Photo of the Day

  • Catch of the Day

    4 Mar 2015 | 9:00 pm
    “The polar bears were usually playing, sleeping, and sometimes nursing,” writes Your Shot member Yoh Fong Chan of observing the bears in Kaktovik, Alaska. “They were hanging out near the shore during this time of the year, waiting for the sea to freeze before they could go out hunting for seals. On this very rare occasion, this bear came proudly from the horizon with its catch of the day.” Chan, who had long dreamed of photographing polar bears in the wild, says patience and endurance were important. “It was bitterly cold out there. As with most wildlife photography, hours were…
  • Mixed Roots

    3 Mar 2015 | 9:00 pm
    The mangroves of the Cayapas Mataje Mangrove Reserve in northwestern Ecuador are the tallest in the world. The area is home to many Afro-Ecuadorian communities who rely on gathering black cockles that can be found in the mud of the mangroves and sold as a culinary delicacy. Picking shells is a tremendously arduous task, as concheros have to crouch down for hours in knee-deep mud. See more images from Felipe Jacome’s photo essay, “Lord of the Mangroves,” on Proof.
  • High-Foraging Chamois

    Stefano Unterthiner / National Geographic
    2 Mar 2015 | 9:00 pm
    Springtime is when high-foraging chamois give birth; there are now about 8,000 in Italy’s Gran Paradiso National Park. See more photos from the February 2015 feature story “Paradise Found.” Get the story of how Stefano Unterthiner fell in love with photography as a teenager in Gran Paradiso National Park.
  • Icesheet #4727

    Murray Fredericks 2013
    1 Mar 2015 | 9:00 pm
    A constellation of orbs, rings, and halos hangs above the Greenland ice sheet in this picture by Murray Fredericks, who spent months photographing the island’s remote beauty. The optical phenomena seen here occur when ice crystals—suspended by powerful winds called piteraqs—refract sunlight. ICESHEET #4727, 22° AND 46° HALO, TANGENT ARC, PARRY ARC, CIRCUMZENITHAL ARC, AND PARHELIC CIRCLE See more photos from the March 2015 feature story “End of the Earth.” Read more about what it’s like to “photograph nothing” on Proof.
  • Falls in Autumn

    28 Feb 2015 | 9:00 pm
    Dispersing fog and a moment of sunshine bring the falls and foliage of Croatia’s Plitvice Lakes National Park into view on an early autumn morning. The country’s oldest and largest national park, Plitvice boasts more than plunging waterfalls: Its 16 terraced lakes, formed by natural travertine dams, change color throughout the day, and its abundant wildlife includes 261 species of birds. Vedrana Tafra’s image was recently featured in Your Shot’s Daily Dozen. This photo was submitted to Your Shot, our storytelling community where members can take part in photo assignments, get expert…
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    Voices

  • The Guardians of Raja Ampat: Driving Conservation in Remote Communities

    International League of Conservation Photographers
    5 Mar 2015 | 7:46 am
    This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic Voices blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. THE GUARDIANS OF RAJA AMPAT FILM AND CONCERT TOUR: Driving Conservation with Grand-Scale Media in Remote Communities Text and Photos by John Weller and iLCP Fellow Shawn Heinrichs A thousand faces glowed in the light of the 2-story-tall outdoor theater screen, and the mood of the crowd changed minute to minute in reaction to the film: excited whispers and…
  • C40 Chair, Rio de Janeiro Mayor Eduardo Paes: “cities have committed actions – now we need funds”

    C40 News Team
    5 Mar 2015 | 6:20 am
    Editor’s Note: 2015 marks the 10-year anniversary of C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group. To celebrate these 10 Years of Results, we will be featuring the voices of C40 principals, partners and other thought leaders throughout the year. I have some very important anniversaries to attend to this year. March 1st marks the 450th anniversary of the founding of Rio de Janeiro, while 2015 also sees the 10thanniversary of the creation of C40 and the first anniversary of my tenure as Chairman. As one might imagine, I am bursting with pride to lead the 450th birthday celebrations throughout the…
  • The Deepwater Horizon Catastrophe 5 Years On

    Brett Garling
    5 Mar 2015 | 3:01 am
    No one missed the Deepwater Horizon disaster. People missed the recent oil spill in Bangladesh. But the world witnessed Deepwater Horizon. Millions of gallons of oil flooded the Gulf of Mexico every day — for 87 days. The biggest accidental oil spill ever. Five years later the effects of the Deepwater Horizon blowout still endure. A new study confirms a massive undersea oil mat near the unlucky oil well — Macondo 252 — that blew on April 20th, 2010. Considering this tar mat is the size of Rhode Island, the Gulf is clearly still feeling the affects of the…
  • London’s History Of Mapping

    Mimi Onuoha
    5 Mar 2015 | 12:47 am
    Every weekend, Londoners stream out of their homes and visit the city’s many markets: long stretches of street (off-limits to cars) teeming with stalls of all types of delicious food, trendy clothes, and quirky trinkets. This past weekend, while strolling through one of these markets, I happened upon a booth selling some lovely prints of old London maps. My project for the Fulbright National Geographic Fellowship involves mapping the digital data of groups of Londoner’s relationships, so my excitement at seeing the prints came as no surprise. And of course, I’m not the only one who…
  • What a Family Does for a Year on a Sailboat

    Gregg Treinish
    4 Mar 2015 | 1:54 pm
    National Geographic Emerging Explorer Gregg Treinish and his team at Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation (ASC) bring us stories from around the world about adventuring with purpose. Here, Emily Wolfe checks in with a family on the trip of a lifetime. By Emily Wolfe The Horangic family is spending an entire year on a boat, sailing the seas and doing science. We caught up with Teddy, age 14, Helen, 12, and Basil, 8, after their family’s 15-day Atlantic crossing from Gran Canaria, Spain to St. Lucia. While Teddy and Helen both race small sailboats at home in California, none of…
 
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    Intelligent Travel

  • In Diocletian’s Living Room

    Barbara A. Noe
    5 Mar 2015 | 9:52 am
    I wake to find myself in Diocletian’s living room. A little odd, considering Diocletian lived 1700 years ago. But the Roman emperor’s palace is actually one of history’s great recycling success stories—not to mention one of the world’s great archaeological sites. Let me explain. Diocletian retired to his point of origin, Split, Croatia, at the turn of the fourth century A.D., with plans to raise cabbages and enjoy the Adriatic way of life. In true imperial style, he had built a city-size complex with all the amenities—including a ceremonial entrance court, Egyptian sphinxes,…
  • #NGTRadar: Travel Lately

    Intelligent Travel
    4 Mar 2015 | 12:13 pm
    Travel Lately—a roundup of the best new dispatches from the travel blogosphere—is a regular feature on Intelligent Travel every other Wednesday. You can play, too. Follow us on Twitter @NatGeoTravel and tag your favorite travel stories #NGTRadar to help us find the crème de la crème on the Web. Here are our latest picks: Toto, I have a feeling we’re not in Starbucks anymore. Ordering coffee in Italy can be an art in itself, but don’t be intimidated: Here’s a go-to guide for navigating Italy’s coffee shops. @jdomb Gone are the days of heavy guidebooks and…
  • I Heart My City: Trevor’s Santiago de Compostela

    I Heart My City
    4 Mar 2015 | 10:12 am
    In 2013, Trevor Huxham left Texas for Santiago de Compostela and never looked back. Now an English teacher at a bilingual school, Trevor spends his extracurricular time cataloguing the many pleasures of Santiago de Compostela on his blog, A Texan in Spain. “Not only is Santiago the endpoint of the historic and modern Camino phenomenon, but it is also a lively university town with great seafood and beautiful granite architecture,” he writes. Here are some of Trevor’s favorite things about the World Heritage-listed city he calls home. Follow Trevor on Instagram and…
  • Adventure 101: Skiing the Haute Route

    Intelligent Travel
    3 Mar 2015 | 11:03 am
    Traders and shepherds have traveled through the high passes of the Alps for centuries, but it wasn’t until 1911 that the first skiers completed what is now known as the Haute Route: a six-day, 46-mile traverse through the skyscraping peaks between Chamonix, France, and Zermatt, Switzerland, two of the continent’s iconic ski resorts. Since then, huts have sprung up along the way to offer food and lodging, and the Haute Route has become a rite of passage for adventurous skiers. “People are blown away when they see how big and rugged the terrain is,” says John Race, owner of Northwest…
  • Bookshelf: Great New Travel Reads

    Don George
    3 Mar 2015 | 9:27 am
    Looking for some travel inspiration? Here are three new #TripLit reads that will transport you to a faraway place: > Wide-Open World,by John Marshall The Marshalls learn that six months of sweaty voluntourism draw them together as no family therapist ever can. Don’t miss the spider monkey encounter. > Peaks on the Horizon, by Charlie Carroll Two different journeys interweave in this memoir/escape thriller—one into and the other out of a fascinating but troubled Tibet. > Crow Fair, by Thomas McGuane This short story collection from a master captures the essence of Montana,…
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