National Geographic

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  • Why the Current Mass Extinction Matters

    National Geographic News: Animals
    Simon Worrall
    20 Aug 2014 | 12:14 pm
    We seem indifferent to the mass extinction we're causing, yet we lose a part of ourselves when another animal dies out.
  • Neanderthals Died Out 10,000 Years Earlier Than Thought, With Help From Modern Humans

    National Geographic News: Ancient World
    Dan Vergano
    20 Aug 2014 | 10:02 am
    Neanderthals and modern people overlapped in mosaic fashion for thousands of years, improved dating reveals.
  • Captured Space Dust Is Probably From Beyond Our Solar System

    National Geographic News: Space and Tech
    Michael D. Lemonick
    15 Aug 2014 | 8:01 am
    In the dust collector of a NASA probe, citizen scientists helped find particles that probably came from interstellar space—the first that could be studied on Earth.
  • Worth His Salt

    National Geographic Photo of the Day
    21 Aug 2014 | 9:00 pm
    A salt worker labors at a salt field in the Dien Chau district of Vietnam's Nghe An Province. The district's salt workers sell their product year-round at roadside markets. Nguyen’s picture recently appeared in Your Shot's Daily Dozen. This photo was submitted to Your Shot. Check out the new and improved website, where you can share photos, take part in assignments, lend your voice to stories, and connect with fellow photographers from around the globe.
  • Watch: Grouper Slurps Down A Shark, Not A Typical Meal

    News Watch
    Jason Bittel
    22 Aug 2014 | 9:16 am
    A close-up of an Atlantic goliath grouper. A fish like the one above, was caught on video eating a shark. Photograph by Raul Touzon, National Geographic Creative The Atlantic goliath grouper (Epinephelus itajara) isn’t the meanest or fastest fish on the reef. It has neither venomous barbs nor impressive fangs. But as its name suggests, the goliath grouper does do at least one thing of note: It gets big. Darn big. And as the saying goes, big fish eat little fish. Recently, that little fish was a four-foot shark unfortunate enough to find itself caught on a fisherman’s hook. In the video…
 
 
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    National Geographic Photo of the Day

  • Worth His Salt

    21 Aug 2014 | 9:00 pm
    A salt worker labors at a salt field in the Dien Chau district of Vietnam's Nghe An Province. The district's salt workers sell their product year-round at roadside markets. Nguyen’s picture recently appeared in Your Shot's Daily Dozen. This photo was submitted to Your Shot. Check out the new and improved website, where you can share photos, take part in assignments, lend your voice to stories, and connect with fellow photographers from around the globe.
  • Winter Wilderness

    MICHAEL MELFORD
    20 Aug 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Snow clings to aspens near Taos, New Mexico, in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. A proposal to protect 45,000 acres here in the Carson National Forest is one of some 30 wilderness bills before the U.S. Congress. Since President Lyndon Johnson signed the Wilderness Act in 1964, the number of wilderness areas has increased to more than 750. See more pictures from the September 2014 feature story “50 Years of Wilderness.”
  • Achilles Tang

    19 Aug 2014 | 9:00 pm
    In other places around the world, coral has been decimated by bleaching and disease, but the southern Line Islands’ reefs retain their resilience. Scientists believe the key to coral health is intact ecosystems, where all the native species—including planktivores such as the vividly marked Achilles tang seen here—play their part. See more pictures from the September 2014 feature story “A World Apart: The Southern Line Islands.” Learn more about the Pristine Seas initiative »
  • The Sea Life

    18 Aug 2014 | 9:00 pm
    The Bajau of Malaysia fish and dive for almost everything they eat. Some live in houses on the beach or on stilts; others have no homes but their boats. Her face dusted in bedak sejuk, a cooling powder made of rice and pandan leaves, Alpaida paddles out to visit friends in stilt houses. The teen and her family belong to the tribal group known as the Sea Bajau because they live year-round on their lepa-lepas, handmade houseboats. See more pictures from the September 2014 feature story “The Evolution of Diet.” See more of National Geographic’s coverage on the Future of Food »
  • Those Lion Eyes

    17 Aug 2014 | 9:00 pm
    When photographer Hannes Lochner set up his camera at a water hole in South Africa's Kalahari, he tried hiding it from curious lions because "they might play with it or carry it off," he writes. "On this particular evening, I was in my vehicle just as the sun was setting, the dust in the air creating a special kind of Kalahari light, and a pride of lions arrived. By repeatedly clicking the shutter, I coaxed the ever curious cubs forward." Lochner's picture recently appeared in Your Shot's Daily Dozen. This photo was submitted to Your Shot. Check out the new and improved website, where you can…
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    News Watch

  • Watch: Grouper Slurps Down A Shark, Not A Typical Meal

    Jason Bittel
    22 Aug 2014 | 9:16 am
    A close-up of an Atlantic goliath grouper. A fish like the one above, was caught on video eating a shark. Photograph by Raul Touzon, National Geographic Creative The Atlantic goliath grouper (Epinephelus itajara) isn’t the meanest or fastest fish on the reef. It has neither venomous barbs nor impressive fangs. But as its name suggests, the goliath grouper does do at least one thing of note: It gets big. Darn big. And as the saying goes, big fish eat little fish. Recently, that little fish was a four-foot shark unfortunate enough to find itself caught on a fisherman’s hook. In the video…
  • Who Will Save the Last Primary Forests on Earth?

    Wildlife Conservation Society
    22 Aug 2014 | 8:16 am
    By Brendan Mackey and James Watson It’s now or never if the world’s surviving primary forests are to be saved. Will the international community act or continue to turn a blind eye to our planet’s key life support systems? Despite their shortcomings, international environmental agreements can provide incentives for national governments and land custodians to turn back the tide of forest destruction. Primary forests, however, remain invisible in forest policy debates and oddly off the radar for most conservation organizations. A view of the Congo’s primary forests from Nyungwe…
  • Updates From the North Woods

    Shedd Aquarium
    22 Aug 2014 | 8:10 am
    Guest post by Eric Larson, postdoctoral research associate, Shedd Aquarium Where Am I? I’m working predominantly in Vilas County, Wisconsin out of the University of Notre Dame’s Environmental Research Center (UNDERC), as well as doing some research at the University of Wisconsin’s Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site on Trout Lake. Off the football field, the Fighting Irish and Badgers have actually been great collaborators up here over the years. Although I’ll be working primarily in the Great Lakes in the future, my first project here is building on long-term datasets on native…
  • Social-Ecological Marine Restoration: A New Vision of Benefits for Nature – And People

    The Nature Conservancy
    21 Aug 2014 | 2:18 pm
    The sea goldie (Pseudanthias squamipinnis) a small species of colourful fish. It is a common sight to scuba divers in the Indian Ocean. Credit: Assaf Zvuloni By Dr. Michael Beck, lead marine scientist, The Nature Conservancy Location Post: The Gulf of Aqaba. Red Sea reef restoration projects. Last month, I dove on some amazing reef restoration projects that have helped to transform the Gulf of Aqaba. From reducing effluents of aquaculture and the rebuilding of reef structures, to the eradication of coral predators and the protection of the reef in parks, these reefs were restored to have…
  • Are You Kidding? Larger Tanks Won’t Cut it for Killer Whales

    Maddalena Bearzi
    21 Aug 2014 | 11:20 am
    Once again Sea World is missing the point. The aquatic entertainment enterprise just doesn’t seem to give up despite documentaries like Blackfish and a growing public awareness that keeping cetaceans in captivity is cruel and morally wrong. Even Wall Street is turning its back on the company. Now, with a new and grandiose multi-million dollar plan for expanding their killer whale tanks, Sea World is taking the “logical” next step to resurrect itself. In this press release image released by SeaWorld Entertainment last week, the company depicts a state-of-the-art, innovative home for its…
 
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    Intelligent Travel

  • Event-o-Rama: 5 Must-Dos in September

    Intelligent Travel
    22 Aug 2014 | 7:52 am
    There are some amazing events on tap all over the world, all the time. Here’s a taste of what you can see and do in September: Mark the changing of the seasons and the phases of the moon at the Mid-Autumn Festival (September 8) on Hong Kong Island. The annual harvest celebration boasts a fire dragon dance, a “lantern wonderland,” and mooncakes galore. What more could you ask for? Speaking of harvest festivals, Kerala, India, is home to one of the most spectacular: Onam (August 29-September 7). This ten-day observance commemorates the yearly homecoming of the mythical Hindu…
  • Video: The Gardians of France

    Bob Krist
    21 Aug 2014 | 10:43 am
    Like their American counterparts, the cowboys, France’s gardians cut a dashing figure and loom large in the culture of the southern France. Part of a brotherhood formed in the early 16th century, the gardians are the caretakers of the herds of beautiful gray horses and black bulls that roam the largely unfenced Camargue region.  But there are financial and cultural pressures squeezing the men and women who make this their life’s work, and today there are fewer than 40 or so professional gardians left in the Camargue. I spent some time with the gardians and their handsome charges…
  • I Heart My City: Luke’s Macau

    I Heart My City
    20 Aug 2014 | 1:56 pm
    Michigander Luke Lienau’s relationship with Macau began in 2002 with a visit to see his girlfriend, a native of the Chinese Special Administrative Region. In the course of traveling back and forth for nearly a decade, he became fascinated with the city and its changes. When Luke finally decided to move to be with his now-wife and daughter, leaving behind his corporate job to work as an English tutor, his passion for Macau only grew. “I am proud to be able to observe and participate in what is likely the most important era in the city’s history since its founding nearly 500…
  • #NGTRadar: Travel Lately

    Intelligent Travel
    20 Aug 2014 | 10:45 am
    The Radar—the latest and best from the travel blogosphere—is a regular feature on Intelligent Travel every other Wednesday. You can play, too. Follow us on Twitter @NatGeoTravel and tag your favorite travel stories #NGTRadar to help us find the crème de la crème on the Web. Here are our newest picks: If the beautiful Balinese town of Ubud is on your bucket list (and it should be), make sure to plan for a few extra days to explore the surrounding area. A forest of monkeys eager to steal your food, specialty crafts waiting to be purchased, and beautiful hot springs are just a…
  • Out of the Ashes: Valparaíso

    Ben Long
    20 Aug 2014 | 10:20 am
    Port cities are among the planet’s most interesting destinations. The exchange of cultures, customs, and cuisine that happens there is real-time living history that anyone can witness. Valparaíso presents a great example of this. For instance, what do the California gold rush and the Panama Canal have to do with a port city in Chile? When fortune seekers boarded ships on America’s East Coast to make the long journey to California (aren’t interstates grand?), they had to sail the whole way around South America to get there. After navigating the rough waters around Tierra del…
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    Digital Nomad

  • Fort Collins Steers Forward, Beyond Boulder

    Robert Reid
    21 Aug 2014 | 1:16 pm
    “We bike and drink beer. And that’s pretty much it.” A barista in Fort Collins, Colorado, is describing local life here as she readies a hand-pour cup of an Ethiopian bean she calls “delicate, like a flower” (with a wink). We’re at Bean Cycle, a downtown café/printing press on a block of late 19th-century buildings that inspired Disneyland’s Main Street. “Oh, maybe you should try yoga.” Fifty-fives miles north of its acclaimed rival college town Boulder, Fort Collins has quietly remade its “aggie town” rep over the past several years.
  • The Ultimate Road Trip Through America’s Mountains and Prairies

    Robert Reid
    18 Aug 2014 | 7:05 am
    Lyrically, “America the Beautiful” covers “sea to shining sea,” but at its heart it’s about where prairies and mountains meet. Katharine Lee Bates, a schoolteacher-poet from Massachusetts, wrote it in 1895, after a trip up Pike’s Peak in Colorado Springs, where she looked east over the plains and soon found herself reaching for a pen. It is a dramatic pairing though, those purple mountains and those amber fields. They’re not always connected on itineraries, but both are partners, vast and inspiring in their own ways. The mountains’ crammed pathways amidst…
  • Northeast by Train: America’s Eurail Experience

    Robert Reid
    24 Jul 2014 | 10:57 am
    One of the great things about visiting Europe is getting around by train. Even short hops get you to places with new cultures, languages, cuisines, even types of chocolate. Truth is, you can do that in the U.S., particularly along the Northeast Corridor. I’ve long wanted to do this—connect the dots by train or bus between Boston, New York, Philadelphia, and Washington, D.C., in a single trip. Now that I have, I wonder why more people don’t? It makes a lot of sense. For my trip, I picked fun city escapes that, in most cases, had escaped the notice of most travelers, and even some…
  • Finding Life in a D.C. Swamp

    Robert Reid
    18 Jul 2014 | 8:24 am
    “Here, rub this on your legs,” a man in a funny hat is saying to me. “It might help.” Walter McDowney is a national park ranger at Washington, D.C.’s Kenilworth Park and Aquatic Gardens. He’s not your usual guide. For one, he’s handing me “jewel weed” he’s picked from a thicket that could fend off poison ivy that I may or may not have tramped through already (I hadn’t). And during his tour, McDowney, who grew up across the street, points out a flower we pass. “See this plant?” he asks, poking at a small greenish bulb. “If you eat too many of its seeds, something…
  • Beyond the Dome: A Walk Around D.C.’s Secret Capitol Hill

    Robert Reid
    16 Jul 2014 | 11:51 am
    A Corgi and a Rottweillerish mutt weave between tombstones like X-wing fighters attacking the Death Star. Over by J. Edgar Hoover’s grave, which faces the city prison, two poodles slurp from a water bowl below an old-fashioned faucet. I’m learning this is just an average day at the capital’s Congressional Cemetery. “We’ve been coming here since we came to D.C. seven years ago,” one woman says in an afternoon drizzle, referring to herself and her lab, who pay $275 each year to run about the 35-acre cemetery established in 1807. The owner of the poodles adds, “I think all…
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