National Geographic

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  • Extremely Rare White Rhino Dies in Kenya—His Kind Nearly Extinct

    National Geographic News: Animals
    Christine Dell'Amore
    20 Oct 2014 | 12:19 pm
    The northern white rhinoceros is one step closer to extinction with the death of Suni, one of only two breeding males left of the subspecies.
  • Queen of the Underworld Sheds New Light on Greek Tomb

    National Geographic News: Ancient World
    Heather Pringle
    18 Oct 2014 | 7:39 am
    Newly revealed mosaic may hold key to unlocking mystery: Who was buried in the massive mound?
  • "Lost" Satellite Photos Reveal Surprising Views of Earth in the 1960s

    National Geographic News: Space and Tech
    James Thomson
    20 Oct 2014 | 3:11 pm
    Images include the Aral Sea before it dried up, the most Antarctic ice on record, and possibly the first shots of Europe from space.
  • Tottori Sand Dunes

    National Geographic Photo of the Day
    19 Oct 2014 | 9:00 pm
    The Tottori sand dunes—the largest in Japan—rise toward the horizon in the country’s south. The coastal dunes were formed by sand and wind over 100,000 years. In the distance, lighted squid-fishing boats bob on the Sea of Japan. This photo was submitted to the 2014 National Geographic Photo Contest. Download wallpaper » See all contest entries » Browse galleries of our editors' favorites »
  • Antarctica 2014: Success at Lewis Bay

    News Watch
    Kenneth W W Sims
    20 Oct 2014 | 4:57 pm
    After many delays, Ken Sims is finally on ice—antarctic ice. He is studying the origins of ancient, frozen volcanic islands around Antarctica by analyzing their rocks. Dangers abound, but Ken is willing to brave them for science. A helicopter at the cliffs of Lewis Bay. Note the ice seracs overhead and avalanche debris below. (Photo by John Catto) I am back in Antarctica to do what we could not do two years ago because of thin ice, and were not able to do last year because of the “partial” government shut down, which is to sample the volcanic sea cliffs of Mt. Bird at Lewis Bay on Ross…
 
 
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    National Geographic Photo of the Day

  • Tottori Sand Dunes

    19 Oct 2014 | 9:00 pm
    The Tottori sand dunes—the largest in Japan—rise toward the horizon in the country’s south. The coastal dunes were formed by sand and wind over 100,000 years. In the distance, lighted squid-fishing boats bob on the Sea of Japan. This photo was submitted to the 2014 National Geographic Photo Contest. Download wallpaper » See all contest entries » Browse galleries of our editors' favorites »
  • Over the River

    18 Oct 2014 | 9:00 pm
    A tar mine edges up to a boreal forest and the MacKay River in northern Alberta, Canada. Photographer Garth Lenz speaks of the “insane scale” of the industrialization he photographs in the province, which has undergone dramatic changes since oil sands development began. Lenz uses aerial photography to capture the immensity of the altered landscape. Garth Lenz’s aerial photographs of landscapes transformed by energy production were recently featured on our photography blog, Proof.
  • Stars Over Shivling

    Peter McBride
    17 Oct 2014 | 9:00 pm
    At 21,467 feet, India’s Mount Shivling rises toward a clear night sky. Here in the Garhwal Himalaya lies the Gangotri glacier—and the headwaters of the Ganges River. Pete McBride’s source-to-sea expedition, following the length of the Ganges River, was recently featured on our photography blog, Proof.
  • Rains in Africa

    WILLETTE PHOTOGRAPHY
    16 Oct 2014 | 9:00 pm
    “The clouds initially caught my eye,” writes Your Shot member Keith Willette. “This rumbling storm was coming in and I was hoping to catch some lightning bolts. Then I noticed the giraffe.” Willette had been photographing giraffes and elephants in Kenya’s Masai Mara and was about to return to camp because of the storm. “I asked to stay just a little longer because the smell of the storm and the peaceful quietness were something I wanted to enjoy just a bit more,” he writes. “Luckily, clouds broke through and illuminated the giraffe.” Willette’s picture recently appeared in…
  • Autumn in Aomori

    15 Oct 2014 | 9:00 pm
    The morning sun kindles a view of fall foliage on Lake Towada in Aomori, Japan. Sitting at the base of Mount Hakkoda, the lake and the annual autumn display of its forested banks are a popular tourist draw. This photo was submitted to the 2014 National Geographic Photo Contest. Download wallpaper » See all contest entries » Browse galleries of our editors' favorites »
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    News Watch

  • Antarctica 2014: Success at Lewis Bay

    Kenneth W W Sims
    20 Oct 2014 | 4:57 pm
    After many delays, Ken Sims is finally on ice—antarctic ice. He is studying the origins of ancient, frozen volcanic islands around Antarctica by analyzing their rocks. Dangers abound, but Ken is willing to brave them for science. A helicopter at the cliffs of Lewis Bay. Note the ice seracs overhead and avalanche debris below. (Photo by John Catto) I am back in Antarctica to do what we could not do two years ago because of thin ice, and were not able to do last year because of the “partial” government shut down, which is to sample the volcanic sea cliffs of Mt. Bird at Lewis Bay on Ross…
  • October 19, 2014: Creating Electricity From Food Waste, Arresting Poachers and More

    Justin O'Neill
    20 Oct 2014 | 4:18 pm
    Many countries don’t have a power grid that reaches 100% of their citizens. But Thomas Culhane has an invention that could give light from decomposing food. (photo by James P. Blair/National Geographic) Every week, embark with host Boyd Matson on an exploration of the latest discoveries and interviews with some of the most fascinating people on the planet, on National Geographic Weekend. Please check listings near you to find the best way to listen to National Geographic Weekend on radio, or listen below! HOUR 1 – Following the discovery of a complete skeleton for the 50-foot long…
  • Puppy-Size Tarantula Found: Explaining World’s Biggest Spider

    Christine Dell'Amore
    20 Oct 2014 | 12:25 pm
    The world’s largest spider has crept back into the spotlight, thanks to a scientist who describes a harrowing encounter with a tarantula. Harvard entomologist Piotr Naskrecki recently recounted on his blog coming across a puppy-sized, foot-long (0.3-meter) South American Goliath birdeater (Theraphosa blondi) a few years ago in Guyana (map). “I could clearly hear its hard feet hitting the ground and dry leaves crumbling under its weight,” Naskrecki wrote about his nighttime run-in. “I pressed the switch and pointed the light at the source of the sound, expecting to…
  • Why a Swordfish’s Sword Doesn’t Break

    Carrie Arnold
    20 Oct 2014 | 11:55 am
    A swordfish’s “sword” is its most prominent feature, but scientists have only now discovered the unusual properties that keep the sword strong and ready to slash. A study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences reveals that the fish have an unusual way to repair their bone, keeping it strong and stiff. Billfish such as this broadbill swordfish can repair minor damage to the upper jawbone that forms their sword, scientists have found. Photograph by Brian Skerry, National Geographic Billfish like marlin and swordfish are known for their…
  • 5 Sky Events This Week: Orion’s Meteors, Hidden Sun, and Zodiacal Light

    Andrew Fazekas
    20 Oct 2014 | 9:33 am
    Zodiacal light is a triangular glow seen best in night skies free of  light pollution. Courtesy of ESO/Y. Beletsky A spooky celestial sky show delights sky-watchers this week, in anticipation of October’s Halloween holiday, by offering everything from shooting stars to a solar disappearing act to ghostly light from beyond. Orionids peak. In the predawn hours of Tuesday, October 21, and the following mornings, the Orionid meteor shower peaks, with as many as 20 shooting stars zipping across the sky every hour. The Orionids appear to radiate out from their namesake constellation…
 
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    Intelligent Travel

  • Louisiana, Three Ways: NOLA

    Andrew Nelson
    20 Oct 2014 | 12:30 pm
    A sign showing two crossed baguettes topped by a skull welcomes me to Killer Poboys, a New Orleans hole-in-the-wall known for its renegade version of Louisiana’s state sandwich, the po’ boy. The eatery is crammed into a back room of the Erin Rose, a pub sitting just a stumble up from the 24/7 party known as Bourbon Street. Few of Bourbon’s revelers will find it; fewer still will know to squeeze past Erin Rose’s regulars to the tiny kitchen area, where crusty French loaves bulging with Gulf shrimp seasoned with coriander or sliced pork belly flavored with rum are being assembled by the…
  • Problem Solved: Yellow Fever Vaccines

    Christopher Elliott
    20 Oct 2014 | 10:53 am
    National Geographic Traveler Editor at Large Christopher Elliott is the magazine’s consumer advocate and ombudsman. Over the past 15 years he has helped countless readers fix their trips. Here’s his latest advice: Reader Question: Everyone’s talking about Ebola right now, but I’ve heard there’s a yellow fever vaccine shortage. I’m planning a trip to Brazil. What do I need to know? My Answer: Last year, Sanofi-Pasteur, the sole manufacturer of the vaccine in the United States, experienced some shortages in its supply chain. “The shortage has improved markedly,” says…
  • I Heart My National Park: Guadalupe Mountains

    I Heart My National Park
    17 Oct 2014 | 12:11 pm
    The Guadalupe Mountains of West Texas were once a reef growing beneath the waters of an ancient inland sea. That same vanished sea spawned the honeycomb of the Carlsbad Caverns, just 40 miles north across the New Mexico border. From the highway, the mountains resemble a nearly monolithic wall through the desert. But drive into one of the national park entrances, take even a short stroll, and surprises crop up: dramatically contoured canyons, shady glades surrounded by desert scrub, a profusion of wildlife and birds. Keene Haywood—on Twitter @keeneh—has been a frequent visitor to…
  • Five Voodoo Haunts in the Caribbean

    Intelligent Travel
    17 Oct 2014 | 10:10 am
    Vengeful gods, terrifying sorcerers, and death-dealing demons populate the legends and beliefs of the Caribbean, deriving from a potent blend of voodoo, Catholicism, and folklore. 1. Port-au-Prince, Haiti In the home of voodoo, the god of death, Gede, is said to stand at the crossroads to the afterworld. Represented as an undertaker, his clothes are black and he wears dark glasses, while his followers are disguised as corpses. Some voodoo sorcerers own a magic stick called a coco macaque that walks by itself and is sent out to perform vengeful deeds. 2. Vieux Fort, St. Lucia Practitioners of…
  • Leaf-Peeping Paradise: The Finger Lakes

    Guest Blogger
    16 Oct 2014 | 2:27 pm
    By Amelia Mularz Attention, foliage fanatics: we are approaching peak season for yellows and reds. This is not a test. Repeat, this is not a test. Have your best cable-knit sweater at the ready and prepare for a weekend of extreme coziness. Among leaf scenes, New York’s is one of the best. Governor Andrew Cuomo recently boasted that the Empire State has “one of the most vivid autumns anywhere in the world.” (For Vermont, those are fighting words.) Spotters from I Love New York track changes, issuing a thorough weekly report in which pigment progress is described in terms of…
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